HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Protein causes muscle wasting syndrome in mice

The Johns Hopkins researchers who first identified myostatin as a key restrictor of muscle growth in animals now report that excessive amounts of the protein in mice cause rapid and dramatic loss of both muscle and fat, without affecting appetite.

The results, obtained by implanting cells engineered to make extra myostatin into adult mice, support the idea of targeting myostatin to find potential new treatments for muscle-wasting diseases like muscular dystrophy, the team from Johns Hopkins and pharmaceutical company Wyeth report in the May 24 issue of Science.

"We now know that myostatin can affect muscle growth and maintenance in adult animals and that it acts throughout the body," says Se-Jin Lee, M.D., Ph.D., professor of molecular biology and genetics in the School of Medicine's Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences. "These are key pieces of information, because agents interfering with myostatin could only help if the protein normally acts postnatally."

The situation observed in mice is similar to a common and largely untreatable complication of certain cancers, AIDS and other diseases in humans -- extreme loss of both muscle and fat, even while food consumption is normal. However, the researchers caution that it's still unknown whether myostatin is involved in the human wasting syndrome, called cachexia (ka-KEX-ee-a).

"We don't know whether myostatin is a key mediator in human wasting syndromes, but our findings raise the possibility that blocking myostatin activity may have beneficial effects in patients with cachexia," says Teresa Zimmers, Ph.D., who carried out the studies as a graduate student at Hopkins. "At the very least the finding will help clarify aspects of muscle wasting in general."

Previous studies had proved that myostatin normally limits muscle growth; mice without a working myostatin gene develop more muscle than normal mice, making them so-called "mighty mice." Until now the researchers weren't
'"/>

Contact: Joanna Downer
jdowner1@jhmi.edu
410-614-5105
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
23-May-2002


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Protein is key to fatal disorder and normal cell function
2. Protein is key for digestive function of the pancreas
3. Proteins show promise for mosquito control
4. Protein involved in childhood disorder linked to cancer
5. Protein fishing in America: The movie
6. Protein vaccine fully protects mice from lethal aerosol challenge with ricin toxin
7. Protein key to trafficking in nerve terminals
8. Protein controls acid in cells by direct detection of volume changes, study finds
9. Protein believed to control formation of memory identified by Scripps & UCSD scientists
10. Protein stops blood-vessel growth, holds promise as cancer therapy
11. Proteins transform DNA into molecular velcro

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Protein causes muscle wasting syndrome mice

(Date:8/28/2014)... in German . ... with the help of sophisticated assembly lines. Mobile assembly carriers, ... part of these assembly lines. In the case of a ... stages arranged in a precise spatial and chronological sequence, resulting ... , The creation of such an assembly line at molecular ...
(Date:8/28/2014)... to alert the world to Global Warming, has called ... stored underground. He says that Carbon Capture, combined with ... to avoid global warming getting out of control over ... York) made the call during his presentation to the ... are meeting to discuss Carbon Capture and Storage. ...
(Date:8/28/2014)... action is needed to ensure safeguards are in place ... PLOS ONE , researchers from Monash University, Stellenbosch ... combining results from different studies - to look at ... to determine whether they actually protect biodiversity. , ... an area from human exploitation made common sense, however, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Nanoscale assembly line 2Nanoscale assembly line 3Global warming pioneer calls for CO2 to be taken from atmosphere and stored underground 2Protected areas proven to protect biodiversity 2
(Date:8/28/2014)... A new research platform uses a laser ... structures undergoing stress and heating, an approach ... for microelectronics and batteries., This new technique, ... how heating and the surface stress of ... have discussed the merits of surface-stress influence ...
(Date:8/28/2014)... Aug. 28, 2014   SunTrust Robinson Humphrey ... veterans to its equity research team in biotechnology ... expansion in equity research demonstrates our commitment to ... to enhance their investment decision making," said ... "We continue to make significant investments in differentiated ...
(Date:8/28/2014)... Vt. (PRWEB) August 28, 2014 ... testing around the world is available from Strategic ... diagnostics companies. “ Industrial Microbiology Market Review, Fourth ... Industrial Market ” (IMMR—4) tracks and compares microbiology ... in North America, Europe and Asia, and forecasts ...
(Date:8/27/2014)... Salt Lake City, Utah (PRWEB) August 27, 2014 ... new construction that will expand its current Salt Lake ... operations currently underway outside of Utah to ultimately create ... the next 20 years. , “Utah is home ... many of whom can be credited with Varian’s success ...
Breaking Biology Technology:New analytical technology reveals 'nanomechanical' surface traits 2New analytical technology reveals 'nanomechanical' surface traits 3SunTrust Robinson Humphrey Expands Equity Research in Healthcare and Energy 2SunTrust Robinson Humphrey Expands Equity Research in Healthcare and Energy 32 Billion Industrial Microbiology Tests Conducted for Product Quality and Safety Worldwide 22 Billion Industrial Microbiology Tests Conducted for Product Quality and Safety Worldwide 3Varian Medical Systems Groundbreaking on Facility Expansion Triggers Influx of New Jobs to Salt Lake 2Varian Medical Systems Groundbreaking on Facility Expansion Triggers Influx of New Jobs to Salt Lake 3
Cached News: