HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Protein critical for development in fruit flies found to aid healing of cuts and wounds in mammals

Biologists at the University of California, San Diego have determined that a protein essential for the normal embryonic development of fruit flies is also used by mammals to assist in the timely healing of cuts and lacerations.

Their discovery, detailed in the June 3 issue of the journal Developmental Cell, provides new insight for scientists into the molecular mechanisms responsible for wound healing in humans and may one day lead to the design of new drugs for individuals whose healing is compromised.

Improving wound healing is particularly important for burn victims and others with slow healing skin lesions like those associated with diabetes. Diabetes now affects more than 17 million Americans and the most prevalent form-type 2, or insulin-resistant diabetes-continues to skyrocket. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that the number of diagnosed cases will increase 165 percent by 2050, as the number of overweight adults and children climbs in the United States.

Geneticists have long been aware of the role played by "c-Jun"-a protein called a "transcription factor" because it turns genes on and off- in bringing cells together during the embryonic development of Drosophila, the fruit flies commonly used in genetic research. For many years, Drosophila biologists have even suspected that the same biochemical pathways involved in a process called dorsal closure in the development of fly embryos were involved in wound healing in mammals. During dorsal closure in Drosophila, sheets of cells come together and fuse along the dorsal midline. The process looks similar to the way sheets of skin cells come together during wound healing in mammals.

"However, healing skin is a very different thing than putting together sheets of cells in making a fly," says Randall S. Johnson, an associate professor of biology at UCSD who headed the research team. "So we really weren't sure what to expect when we began our study. But we
'"/>

Contact: Sherry Seethaler
sseethaler@ucsd.edu
858-534-4656
University of California - San Diego
2-Jun-2003


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Protein is key to fatal disorder and normal cell function
2. Protein is key for digestive function of the pancreas
3. Proteins show promise for mosquito control
4. Protein involved in childhood disorder linked to cancer
5. Protein fishing in America: The movie
6. Protein vaccine fully protects mice from lethal aerosol challenge with ricin toxin
7. Protein key to trafficking in nerve terminals
8. Protein controls acid in cells by direct detection of volume changes, study finds
9. Protein believed to control formation of memory identified by Scripps & UCSD scientists
10. Protein stops blood-vessel growth, holds promise as cancer therapy
11. Proteins transform DNA into molecular velcro

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/14/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... November 13, 2019 , ... Personalized ... the first patients in an FDA approved clinical trial for stem cell treatment ... the formation of the company as a subsidiary of VetStem Biopharma. , In July ...
(Date:11/12/2019)... ... 12, 2019 , ... The Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation ... institutions for its Instrumentation Grant for Advanced Light-Sheet Microscopy and Data Science ... for the acquisition of instrumentation, development and maintenance; support for data science collaborations ...
(Date:11/9/2019)... ... November 08, 2019 , ... StageBio ... histology, pathology, biomarker development, and archiving services for the biopharmaceutical, medical device ... Histo-Scientific Research Laboratories (HSRL), Vet Path Services (VPS) and Tox Path Specialists ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/5/2019)... , ... November 04, 2019 ... ... of advanced delivery technologies, development, and manufacturing solutions for drugs, biologics, gene ... cell line development technology, GPEx® Boost. The technology enhances Catalent’s proven GPEx ...
(Date:11/2/2019)... , ... October 31, 2019 , ... ... Adaptive Biotechnologies in a live webinar on Friday, November 15, ... immuno-oncology. , Immunosequencing, the science of profiling T-cell receptors (TCRs) and B-cell ...
(Date:10/29/2019)... ... 28, 2019 , ... CaroGen Corporation , a biotechnology company, today announced ... Professor Jack R Wands, MD, of Brown University , Dr. Steve Projan, ... Mor, MD, PhD, of Wayne State University, formerly a professor at Yale University School ...
(Date:10/22/2019)... ... ... nQ Medical, Inc. of Cambridge, MA, was recognized in the top 5 ... at a showcase event yesterday in Los Angeles. nQ competed against 3,500 early-stage U.S. ... near-term growth projections to be named one of the most fundable companies in America. ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: