HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Protein found in yeast and humans appears to play a key role in regulating cell growth

What do humans have in common with yeast -- that lowly, single-celled organism known best for its role in making beer and bread?

Plenty, according to researchers at Seattle's Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, who have found that humans and yeast share a protein that appears to play a key role in regulating cell growth.

Ronald Reeder, Ph.D., a member of the Hutchinson Center's Basic Sciences Division, heads the group that published the results of this work earlier this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Early Edition No. 12). Co-authors on the paper are research associate Beth Moorefield, Ph.D., and biocomputing specialist Elizabeth Greene, Ph.D., both of the Hutchinson Center. The protein, called Rrn3, may play a pivotal role in the chain of events that determines how fast cells grow.

"For a protein to be functionally conserved from yeast all the way up to humans implies there must be a reason that it has been preserved from an evolutionary standpoint," Reeder says. "We know that if you don't have this protein, you don't grow. Even if there are other mechanisms that human cells use to regulate cell growth, the fact that this one is so well conserved in humans means it's an important piece of the puzzle in our understanding of growth control."

While Reeder and colleagues are primarily excited about this fundamental new understanding of the molecular mechanisms that trigger cell growth, the discovery that Rrn3 functions in humans as well as yeast may have several long-range benefits.

This regulatory molecule may be a unique drug target, as disabling it might halt the growth of cancer cells. The protein also might be used as a biomarker to develop highly sensitive cancer-screening methods, as the activity of Rrn3 is expected to mirror the rate of cell growth throughout the body.

"If you were looking at the thymus or the liver, for example, and wanted to distinguish cells that were doing normal things vs. ce
'"/>

Contact: Kristen Woodward
kwoodwar@fhcrc.org
206-667-5095
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
13-Apr-2000


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Protein is key to fatal disorder and normal cell function
2. Protein is key for digestive function of the pancreas
3. Proteins show promise for mosquito control
4. Protein involved in childhood disorder linked to cancer
5. Protein fishing in America: The movie
6. Protein vaccine fully protects mice from lethal aerosol challenge with ricin toxin
7. Protein key to trafficking in nerve terminals
8. Protein controls acid in cells by direct detection of volume changes, study finds
9. Protein believed to control formation of memory identified by Scripps & UCSD scientists
10. Protein stops blood-vessel growth, holds promise as cancer therapy
11. Proteins transform DNA into molecular velcro

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/19/2016)... -- The new GEZE SecuLogic access control ... system solution for all door components. It can be ... interface with integration authorization management system, and thus fulfills ... dimensions of the access control and the optimum integration ... considerable freedom of design with regard to the doors. ...
(Date:4/15/2016)... -- Research and Markets has announced the ...  report to their offering.  ,      ... gait biometrics market is expected to grow at ... Gait analysis generates multiple variables such ... compute factors that are not or cannot be ...
(Date:4/13/2016)... CHICAGO , April 13, 2016  IMPOWER physicians ... are setting a new clinical standard in telehealth ... By leveraging the higi platform, IMPOWER patients can ... weight, pulse and body mass index, and, when they ... quick and convenient visit to a local retail location ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:5/19/2016)... ... May 19, 2016 , ... KCAS Bioanalytical and ... Siddiqui as Director, Large Molecule & Biomarker Bioanalysis. , Dr. Siddiqui has more ... discovery studies for preclinical and clinical safety programs. “We’ve seen significant demand for, ...
(Date:5/19/2016)... -- - I dati saranno presentati nel ... ° Congresso della Società Americana ... - Le conclusioni dello studio indicano un tasso di risposta ... il 90% presenta una d urata della risposta (Duration ... per cento dei pazienti ha riscontrato un beneficio clinico. ...
(Date:5/18/2016)... ... May 18, 2016 , ... Shimadzu Scientific ... The University of Toledo. This two-day camp will take place annually starting June ... field of pharmaceutical sciences in preparation for a university academic program. , ...
(Date:5/18/2016)... ... May 18, 2016 , ... STACS DNA Inc., the sample ... track and report sexual assault kit processing to help them save time and reduce ... escalates for kits to be processed and victims informed of results. Due to a ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: