HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Protein mimetics could lead to more successful coronary bypasses

TEMPE, ARIZONA, May 12, 2003 -- Severe spasm of blood vessels contributes to the failure of coronary bypass surgeries and to strokes following the rupture of an aneurysm in the brain. A complex signaling pathway controls relaxation in smooth muscle cells, but researchers at Arizona State University have discovered how to bypass it.

The research team has created a mimetic of the last protein in the pathway, HSP20, which causes relaxation in the same way as the natural protein. This research, published May 8 in the online version of The FASEB Journal, is a major step in the development of a drug that promotes blood vessel relaxation.

The signaling pathway that causes relaxation in smooth muscle cells involves many different proteins, but the last step is the addition of a phosphate group, or phosphorylation, of the protein HSP20, which actually effects relaxation.

Other groups have developed molecules, such as the active ingredient in Viagra, that affect earlier steps in this pathway. But if a problem occurs in later steps, these compounds are ineffective.

"You've got all those signaling pathways, but, boom, you can bypass them by putting in a mimetic of the protein that's the effector molecule," said primary investigator Colleen Brophy, research professor of bioengineering at ASU, director of the Center for Protein and Peptide Pharmaceuticals in the Arizona Biodesign Institute, and chief of vascular surgery at the Carl T. Hayden Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

The HSP20 mimetic developed at ASU consists of a 13 amino acid stretch of the protein attached to a protein transduction domain, a peptide that allows the mimetic to enter cells. The HSP20 portion of the mimetic includes a phosphate group attached to the same amino acid as in the active version of natural HSP20.

Brophy and colleagues measured the contraction of thin rings of smooth muscle from the coronary arteries of pigs with a force transducer. They pre-contract
'"/>

Contact: Linley Hall
linley.hall@asu.edu
480-965-5854
Arizona State University
12-May-2003


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Protein is key to fatal disorder and normal cell function
2. Protein is key for digestive function of the pancreas
3. Proteins show promise for mosquito control
4. Protein involved in childhood disorder linked to cancer
5. Protein fishing in America: The movie
6. Protein vaccine fully protects mice from lethal aerosol challenge with ricin toxin
7. Protein key to trafficking in nerve terminals
8. Protein controls acid in cells by direct detection of volume changes, study finds
9. Protein believed to control formation of memory identified by Scripps & UCSD scientists
10. Protein stops blood-vessel growth, holds promise as cancer therapy
11. Proteins transform DNA into molecular velcro

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Protein mimetics could lead more successful coronary bypasses

(Date:8/28/2014)... the first person to alert the world to Global ... be captured and stored underground. He says that Carbon ... the best way to avoid global warming getting out ... (Columbia University, New York) made the call during his ... where 150 scientists are meeting to discuss Carbon Capture ...
(Date:8/28/2014)... needed to ensure safeguards are in place to protect ... ONE , researchers from Monash University, Stellenbosch University and ... from different studies - to look at the past ... whether they actually protect biodiversity. , Dr Bernard ... from human exploitation made common sense, however, up until ...
(Date:8/28/2014)... countries will be fully saturated with pests by the ... to a new study led by the University of ... be found in around half the countries that grow ... current rate, scientists fear that a significant proportion of ... the next 30 years. , Crop pests include fungi, ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Global warming pioneer calls for CO2 to be taken from atmosphere and stored underground 2Protected areas proven to protect biodiversity 2New study charts the global invasion of crop pests 2
(Date:8/28/2014)... Best Sanitizers, Inc., a leader in ... industry, is asking industry professionals to prepare for fall ... E2 soap they’re currently using to the Best Sanitizers’ ... Hand hygiene is critical to fighting cross-contamination and the ... key criteria are identified to evaluate the effectiveness of ...
(Date:8/28/2014)... research platform uses a laser to measure ... stress and heating, an approach likely to ... and batteries., This new technique, called nanomechanical ... and the surface stress of microscale structures ... the merits of surface-stress influence on mechanical ...
(Date:8/28/2014)... (PRWEB) August 28, 2014 The ability ... a culture that will allow individuals to perform at ... increasingly important for employers looking to compete in this ... are embracing this trend, as the sector increasingly focuses ... a company, which will have real results on the ...
(Date:8/28/2014)... Sterlitech is proud to announce that ... stable of products . These additional products ... include membrane filters with surface charges. , ... for our membrane process testing equipment, and correspondingly, a ... membranes,” explains Sterlitech President Mark Spatz. “The addition ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Best Sanitizers, Inc. Asks Food Industry Professionals: With Fall Harvest On the Way, Is Your E2 Hand Soap Up to the Task? 2New analytical technology reveals 'nanomechanical' surface traits 2New analytical technology reveals 'nanomechanical' surface traits 3Klein Hersh International Leads Philadelphia Area Life Science Industry in Company Culture 2Klein Hersh International Leads Philadelphia Area Life Science Industry in Company Culture 3Sterlitech Corporation Enhances Its Selection of Flat Sheet Membrane Filters 2
Cached News: