HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Proteins in African HIV strains interact differently with drugs

Naturally occurring genetic variations in HIV-A and HIV-C, the two subtypes of HIV prevalent in Africa, make it harder for inhibitory drugs to bind to the protease, a key protein involved in viral maturation, according to a new report by biologists in The Krieger School of Arts and Sciences of The Johns Hopkins University.

Ernesto Freire, the Henry A. Walters professor of biology, emphasized that the new findings, published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, are based on in-vitro tests of basic biochemical properties, and therefore cannot be used to assess the effectiveness of inhibitor drugs in patient treatments.

Instead, Freire suggested that the results add new support to the argument that scientists need to broaden the focus of HIV drug development, which has been almost exclusively centered on HIV-B.

"More than two-thirds of all AIDS cases today are in Africa, and those cases are predominantly HIV-A and HIV-C," says Freire. "Those different subtypes can vary genetically from the B subtype as much as 10 to 30 percent along their entire genome, and this new report proves that variation can affect interactions between drugs and HIV proteins at a very basic biochemical level. We need to broaden drug development efforts to include these subtypes."

For the research, Freire's group created recombinant forms of the proteases from HIV-A and HIV-C, using information from viral gene databases (GenBank) in Africa to recreate the proteins. HIV-A dominates in the northern part of Sub-Saharan Africa, while HIV-C is prevalent in southern regions.

Freire's lab measured the proteases' efficiency and biochemical fitness through factors related to catalysis, a chemical term for a process where one substance (the protease) accelerates a chemical reaction in another substance (the substrate) without being changed itself. The catalytic action of the protease is v
'"/>

Contact: Michael Purdy
mcp@jhu.edu
410-516-7160
Johns Hopkins University
13-May-2001


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Proteins show promise for mosquito control
2. Proteins transform DNA into molecular velcro
3. Proteins may help identify patients who will respond better to treatments in certain cancers
4. Proteins enable HIV to override cells defenses
5. New Science Press launches Proteins: From Sequence to Structure
6. Report: Proteins can be engineered as widely adaptable bioelectronic sensors
7. Proteins are vastly more complicated than previously realized
8. Life and death struggle: Proteins play against each other, bringing balance to immune system
9. Proteins that bind to sperm offer clues to male fertility and possible male contraception
10. Scientists Show Proteins Function Individually As Part Of DNA Repair
11. Genes Found That Label Cell Proteins For Disposal

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:11/19/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... November 19, 2019 , ... ... research and sample preparation, and Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), a ... partnership in which Diagenode will offer Single-Cell ATAC-Seq (scATAC-Seq) Services, featuring Bio-Rad’s Droplet ...
(Date:11/19/2019)... N.Y. (PRWEB) , ... November 19, 2019 , ... Hosted ... MJBizDaily , MJBizCon 2019 is the largest gathering of MJBiz business ... exceeding 35,000, and programming to benefit every sector, there is no show quite like ...
(Date:11/14/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... November 13, 2019 , ... Personalized ... the first patients in an FDA approved clinical trial for stem cell treatment ... the formation of the company as a subsidiary of VetStem Biopharma. , In July ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:12/27/2019)... ELKRIDGE, Md. (PRWEB) , ... December 27, 2019 ... ... of initial clinical studies for its 505(b)(2) product pipeline that offers ... affect geriatric patients. The products concepts were identified in collaboration with doctors and ...
(Date:12/14/2019)... ... December 12, 2019 , ... Leak Detection Associates (LDA) ... the Pharmaceutical, Biotechnology, Medical Device and Food Packaging Industries is excited to announce ... -80C) helium leak testing system is designed for testing containers at temperatures as ...
(Date:12/4/2019)... ... December 03, 2019 , ... A new study released today in STEM ... even reverse fibrosis (scar tissue) buildup – also improves the range of motion of ... was conducted on mice. , The tumor-destroying capabilities of radiation therapy can be ...
(Date:11/22/2019)... ... November 22, 2019 , ... ... covering a step-by-step cold chain validation guide to meet and exceed increasingly ... complex cold chain biopharmaceutical industry leaders, the September 19, 2019 webinar was ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: