HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Proteins in African HIV strains interact differently with drugs

Naturally occurring genetic variations in HIV-A and HIV-C, the two subtypes of HIV prevalent in Africa, make it harder for inhibitory drugs to bind to the protease, a key protein involved in viral maturation, according to a new report by biologists in The Krieger School of Arts and Sciences of The Johns Hopkins University.

Ernesto Freire, the Henry A. Walters professor of biology, emphasized that the new findings, published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, are based on in-vitro tests of basic biochemical properties, and therefore cannot be used to assess the effectiveness of inhibitor drugs in patient treatments.

Instead, Freire suggested that the results add new support to the argument that scientists need to broaden the focus of HIV drug development, which has been almost exclusively centered on HIV-B.

"More than two-thirds of all AIDS cases today are in Africa, and those cases are predominantly HIV-A and HIV-C," says Freire. "Those different subtypes can vary genetically from the B subtype as much as 10 to 30 percent along their entire genome, and this new report proves that variation can affect interactions between drugs and HIV proteins at a very basic biochemical level. We need to broaden drug development efforts to include these subtypes."

For the research, Freire's group created recombinant forms of the proteases from HIV-A and HIV-C, using information from viral gene databases (GenBank) in Africa to recreate the proteins. HIV-A dominates in the northern part of Sub-Saharan Africa, while HIV-C is prevalent in southern regions.

Freire's lab measured the proteases' efficiency and biochemical fitness through factors related to catalysis, a chemical term for a process where one substance (the protease) accelerates a chemical reaction in another substance (the substrate) without being changed itself. The catalytic action of the protease is v
'"/>

Contact: Michael Purdy
mcp@jhu.edu
410-516-7160
Johns Hopkins University
13-May-2001


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Proteins show promise for mosquito control
2. Proteins transform DNA into molecular velcro
3. Proteins may help identify patients who will respond better to treatments in certain cancers
4. Proteins enable HIV to override cells defenses
5. New Science Press launches Proteins: From Sequence to Structure
6. Report: Proteins can be engineered as widely adaptable bioelectronic sensors
7. Proteins are vastly more complicated than previously realized
8. Life and death struggle: Proteins play against each other, bringing balance to immune system
9. Proteins that bind to sperm offer clues to male fertility and possible male contraception
10. Scientists Show Proteins Function Individually As Part Of DNA Repair
11. Genes Found That Label Cell Proteins For Disposal

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:8/14/2019)... ... August 14, 2019 , ... An upcoming episode of ... microbiome therapeutics are helping to promote normal immune function in order to prevent ... educate about the DECODE.DESIGN.CURE™ technology platform, which rapidly develops microbiome therapeutics in order ...
(Date:8/14/2019)... ... ... Representatives with MyBioGate announced that China Focus@Biotech Week will be held September 10 ... connect with Chinese pharma and investors in healthcare innovation,” said Miao Guo, Vice President ... a part of Biotech Week Boston – the annual biotech festival at the No. ...
(Date:8/14/2019)... ... 13, 2019 , ... Dr. Julie Reck of Veterinary Medical Center of Fort Mill ... first stem cell patient, her own geriatric Australian Shepherd, Simon, was treated in June 2019 ... to play but his body was weak, and he struggled to play fetch and other ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:9/17/2019)... Calif. (PRWEB) , ... September 17, 2019 , ... Tucker, ... osteoarthritis. At only four months old, Tucker was limping and lame on his right ... and elbow dysplasia and it was called “the worst case the vet had seen.” ...
(Date:9/17/2019)... ... September 16, 2019 , ... MyBioGate ... China Focus @ Biotech Week Boston, a forum organized by MyBioGate, Inc. and ... innovation. , After a careful process of evaluation, twelve companies out of over ...
(Date:9/9/2019)... ... 09, 2019 , ... Visikol CEO Dr. Michael Johnson recently gave a ... to characterize 3D cell culture models. The inherent problem of characterizing 3D cell culture ... to image through and therefore traditional wide-field or even confocal microscopy only tells you ...
(Date:8/29/2019)... , ... August 29, 2019 , ... ... disease affecting grapevines, a feat they hope will ultimately help protect the multibillion-dollar ... including several Rochester Institute of Technology faculty and alumni sequenced the microbiome found ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: