HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Proteins show promise for mosquito control

MADISON-Mosquito abatement usually means one thing: blasting the pesky critters with pesticides. Those pesticides, although highly effective, can impair other organisms in the environment.

Que Lan, insect physiologist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and her colleagues in the entomology department are working on a new, more targeted approach to mosquito control: inhibiting their ability to metabolize cholesterol.

Cholesterol, the sticky substance that accumulates on the lining of human arteries, is an important component of cell membranes in vertebrates and invertebrates. In mosquitoes, it is vital for growth, development and egg production.

Unlike humans, mosquitoes cannot synthesize cholesterol. They must obtain it from decomposed plants they eat while in their larval stage, living in shallow waters. Plants make phytosterol, which is converted to cholesterol in the mosquito's gut.

Using the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, Lan and her research colleagues discovered that a sterol-carrying protein, AeSCP-2, is the vehicle that transports cholesterol in mosquito cells. Cholesterol is hydrophobic. In order to transport it in a liquid medium, such as blood or cell fluids, organisms must have a way to shield it from the watery environment through which it moves. That shield is typically a carrier protein, such as SCP-2.

Lan and her colleagues reasoned that if they could block the carrier protein, it would disrupt the uptake of cholesterol by the mosquito. Screening what she calls "a small chemical library of 16,000 compounds," Lan and her team found 57 compounds that inhibited the cholesterol-binding capacity of SCP-2.

The top five most viable inhibitor compounds were then tested on mosquito larvae, producing promising results--the larvae died. The results were dose-dependent; that is, at higher concentrations, larger numbers of larvae died. Still, the concentrations were very small, Lan says, in the range of 10 part
'"/>

Contact: Que Lan
qlan@entomology.wisc.edu
608-263-7924
University of Wisconsin-Madison
10-Sep-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Proteins transform DNA into molecular velcro
2. Proteins may help identify patients who will respond better to treatments in certain cancers
3. Proteins enable HIV to override cells defenses
4. New Science Press launches Proteins: From Sequence to Structure
5. Report: Proteins can be engineered as widely adaptable bioelectronic sensors
6. Proteins in African HIV strains interact differently with drugs
7. Proteins are vastly more complicated than previously realized
8. Life and death struggle: Proteins play against each other, bringing balance to immune system
9. Proteins that bind to sperm offer clues to male fertility and possible male contraception
10. Scientists Show Proteins Function Individually As Part Of DNA Repair
11. Genes Found That Label Cell Proteins For Disposal

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:2/11/2020)... ... February 11, 2020 , ... The LaunchPort™ announced today that ... Port Covington, Baltimore. The newly formed company is developing a novel pulsatile hemodialysis ... demand for home dialysis treatments. The start-up company will be moving research functions ...
(Date:2/6/2020)... ... February 06, 2020 , ... ... to unique lab-made bioresearch materials, today announced an agreement with The Good ... and seafood a reality. Under the partnership, terrestrial meat and aquatic cell lines ...
(Date:1/30/2020)... Ontario (PRWEB) , ... January 30, 2020 , ... ... with an eye on the Canadian market, is pleased to announce that the company ... of growth since the company launched in 2017. , “We are so thrilled ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:2/19/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... February 19, 2020 , ... ... process solutions for the life sciences industry, today announced the opening of a ... Nagamura, Associate Partner, Red Nucleus R&D. , Red Nucleus announced the new office ...
(Date:2/10/2020)... ... February 10, 2020 , ... R3 Medical Training announced it is now ... in Las Vegas. The course is hands on involving real patients and stem cell ... years, the Comprehensive Stem Cell Training Course has received rave reviews from attendees, who ...
(Date:2/3/2020)... Mass. (PRWEB) , ... February 03, 2020 , ... ... US offices in Cambridge, MA, announce that OmniType, the 11-locus, single tube multiplex ... today. OmniType is a best-in-class product featuring locus-multiplexing and short library preparation, for ...
(Date:1/27/2020)... ... 2020 , ... Cerebyte, the leader in “instant mentoring” solutions ... the availability of neuroscience of transformational leadership workshops. These highly interactive, hands-on workshops ... and change research to become great transformational leaders. The workshops are ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: