HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Purdue, Indiana universities collaborate for better medicine

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -- Purdue University and Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have launched a collaboration to increase knowledge of diseases and develop better treatments for humans and animals.

Scientists from Purdue's schools of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine and the IU School of Medicine are initiating the Program of Comparative Medicine through a $2 million, two year start-up grant from the Indiana 21st Century Research and Technology Fund. The program has a total of $4.5 million in initial funding due to contributions from the Purdue schools of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, the IU School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics and the Indiana Genomics Initiative.

"Much of the work we do at Purdue in both the Department of Animal Sciences and the School of Veterinary Medicine impacts both animal and human health," said Randy Woodson, director of agricultural research and co-author of the proposal that netted the state funding. "Purdue's role is to develop animal models for human diseases that also will provide benefits for improved pet and livestock health and productivity."

IU scientists bring to the program expertise in understanding disease development and treatment, said Dr. Mervin Yoder, an professor of pediatrics, biochemistry and molecular biology at IU.

The researchers believe the best way to understand human disease is to understand similar diseases in other animals, said Yoder, who co-wrote the grant proposal with Woodson.

"By studying multiple species, we'll learn more about diseases and ways to treat them," he said.

The research at Purdue will involve a number of current animal sciences and veterinary medicine faculty members and also researchers in two new positions for which the Department of Animal Sciences is recruiting, said department head Alan Grant.

"This draws on our existing facilities and faculties at both universities and also calls for some renovation o
'"/>

Contact: Susan A. Steeves
ssteeves@purdue.edu
765-496-7481
Purdue University
4-Dec-2002


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Indiana University, EPA to study airborne PCBs
2. As informatics grows, Indiana University helps set research agenda
3. Worlds largest scientific society convenes regional meeting June 2-4 in Indianapolis
4. First descriptions of Indiana bat maternity roosts in the southern US
5. Indiana University to become NASA base for space biology studies
6. Largest grant ever to Indiana U fuels Genomics Initiative
7. By all measurements -- Indianas forests are growing
8. Purdue helps Indiana companies with pollution dilemma
9. Water Quality In Indianas White River Basin Affected By Urban And Agricultural Activities
10. K-State, other universities to study how climate affects plant evolution
11. S.C. hospitals and universities form statewide health research collaborative

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Purdue Indiana universities collaborate for better medicine

(Date:10/14/2014)... – Like discriminating thieves, prostate cancer tumors scavenge and ... body. But such avarice may be a fatal weakness. ... way to kill prostate cancer cells by delivering a ... destroys the diseased cells brimming with the mineral, leaving ... two drugs already commercially available for other uses, could ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... years since T. rex took its last ... is breathing life back into dinosaurs using high-powered computer ... has important implications for how dinosaurs used their noses ... of smell and cool their brains. , "Dinosaurs ... Jason Bourke, lead author of the new study published ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... One of the planet,s leading questions is how to ... increasingly variable climate. The Food and Agriculture Organization of ... 70% over the next 40 years to feed a ... of the necessary rise in food production. Plants—grains, ... by supporting livestock. Current research must tap into ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Prostate cancer's penchant for copper may be a fatal flaw 2Dinosaur breathing study shows that noses enhanced smelling and cooled brain 2Dinosaur breathing study shows that noses enhanced smelling and cooled brain 3Building a bridge from basic botany to applied agriculture 2Building a bridge from basic botany to applied agriculture 3
(Date:10/22/2014)... and HONG KONG , Oct. 22, ... therapeutics enterprise, announced today that rare disease expert ... vice president, research. Dr. McKew brings more than two ... positions at the National Institutes of Health, Wyeth Research ... Wyeth). Dr. McKew will lead aTyr,s efforts to expand and ...
(Date:10/20/2014)... 2014 /PRNewswire/ - BIOREM Inc. (TSXV: BRM) ("Biorem" or "the Company") ... orders to $5.8 million and provides a good start to Q4.  ... North America and one in the Middle ... at record levels," said Peter Bruijns , President & CEO. ... of Q3 than they have been for any complete year since ...
(Date:10/20/2014)... Rochelle, Virginia (PRWEB) October 20, 2014 ... of NDA Partners LLC, announced today that Ellen ... and legal support for the pharmaceutical industry, has ... and manager of its legal services practice. ... reports and expert witness and testimony, to top ...
(Date:10/19/2014)... The Asia-Pacific Bromine Market report defines and ... and forecast of revenue. , Browse through the ... to get an idea of the in-depth analysis ... segmentation in the Asia-Pacific bromine market, and is ... http://www.micromarketmonitor.com/market/asia-pacific-bromine-6741503144.html , Bromine is a volatile ...
Breaking Biology Technology:aTyr Pharma Appoints John C. McKew, Ph.D., as Vice President, Research 2aTyr Pharma Appoints John C. McKew, Ph.D., as Vice President, Research 3NDA Partners Appoints Ellen Teplitzky, JD as Director of its Legal Services Practice 2The Asia-Pacific Bromine Market is estimated to grow to $4,080.1 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 2The Asia-Pacific Bromine Market is estimated to grow to $4,080.1 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 3
Cached News: