HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Purdue scientists: To stop cancer, keep your Icmt away from your Ras

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Halting the development of certain pancreatic, ovarian, colon and lung cancers may be possible with therapy based on recent Purdue University research.

By investigating a single molecule that influences cell growth, a research group in the Purdue Cancer Center, including Brian S. Henriksen, has gained new insight into the chain of events that make some cancer cells divide uncontrollably - insight that may eventually lead to a way to break that chain, stopping cancer in its tracks. The molecule, known as Icmt, has a critical role in the development of Ras, an ordinarily beneficial protein that tells a cell to divide. The research group has determined how to inhibit Icmt's influence on Ras, without which the protein cannot develop effectively into an instigator of cell growth.

"A tumor can be seen as cells that forget to stop dividing, and misdeveloped Ras is responsible for some instances of uncontrolled growth," said Henriksen, a graduate student in medicinal chemistry and medical pharmacology in Purdue's School of Pharmacy. "When Ras develops a mutation, it does its job incorrectly, and it becomes a hazard to the body. Our work with Icmt might lead to therapies that could stop errant Ras from causing tumors to progress."

The research was conducted by an interdisciplinary team from two Purdue departments. Co-directing the team are Christine A. Hrycyna, Walther Assistant Professor in the School of Science's chemistry department and Richard A. Gibbs, associate professor in the School of Pharmacy's medicinal chemistry and molecular pharmacology department. Jessica L. Anderson (chemistry) and Henriksen are the principal graduate students involved in the project.

Henriksen will present the group's results at 6 p.m. Sunday (3/28) at the 227th national meeting of the American Chemical Society in Anaheim, Calif.

Ras is a key protein that signals the body's cells to begin or cease dividing, bu
'"/>

Contact: Chad Boutin
cboutin@purdue.edu
765-494-2081
Purdue University
28-Mar-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Purdue study finds antioxidant protects metal-eating plants
2. Bright idea could doom cancer and viruses, say Purdue scientists
3. Purdue yeast makes ethanol from agricultural waste more effectively
4. IU and Purdue scientists to answer questions about Brood X periodical cicadas
5. Purdue scientists finding ways to outsmart crop-damaging bugs
6. Chestnut trees to spread across landscape again, says Purdue scientist
7. Purdue chemists put the twist on protein building block
8. Purdue scientists: Genetically modified fish could damage ecology
9. Fat cells fight disease, Purdue University researchers find
10. Purdue chemist mussels in on secrets of natural adhesives
11. Purdue engineers develop quick, inexpensive method to prototype microchips

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/30/2017)... , March 30, 2017 Trends, opportunities ... (physiological and behavioral), by technology (fingerprint, AFIS, iris recognition, ... recognition, and others), by end use industry (government and ... immigration, financial and banking, and others), and by region ... , Asia Pacific , and ...
(Date:3/24/2017)... -- The Controller General of Immigration from Maldives Mr. ... have received the prestigious international IAIR Award for the most innovative high ... ... Maldives Immigration Controller ... (small picture on the right) have received the IAIR award for the ...
(Date:3/22/2017)... 21, 2017   Neurotechnology , a provider ... today announced the release of the SentiVeillance ... improved facial recognition using up to 10 surveillance, ... computer. The new version uses deep neural-network-based facial ... it utilizes a Graphing Processing Unit (GPU) for ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/19/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 19, 2017 , ... A colony ... among its cells and tissues by delivering pollen and nectar containing nutrients necessary for ... means to stay healthy. , Many recent indicators point to a decline in honey ...
(Date:6/16/2017)... , ... June 16, 2017 , ... ... and analytics solutions, today announced that its Anzo Smart Data Lake® (Anzo ... Technology Solution’ category for the 2017 Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) CODiE ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... ... June 15, 2017 , ... New resistant soybean ... options for managing Palmer amaranth and other broadleaf weeds resistant to glyphosate. But ... necessary. Auxin herbicides are known to drift and to cause harm to sensitive, ...
(Date:6/15/2017)... PA (PRWEB) , ... June 15, 2017 , ... ... Esther Klein Gallery (EKG) follows an artist’s journey through creative experimentation and interdisciplinary ... 2017 and runs through July 22nd. An opening reception will be held at ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: