HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Putting randomness to work: unique form of nanoscale random motion may drive key cellular functions

of a phosphate -- releases from the microtubule.
  • ATP hydrolysis makes the switch mechanism irreversible. Though ATP normally provides energy for macromolecular synthesis, Fox argues that in motor proteins ATP performs a switching role, changing the protein conformation and its binding affinity.
  • The unbound head -- just 5-7 nanometers in diameter -- is moved about randomly by Brownian motion in the cellular fluid until it encounters a new site where it can bind. Reported in the early 1800s by biologist Robert Brown, Brownian motion is the irregular activity of tiny particles suspended in a fluid. It results from the thermally driven movement of molecules in a fluid, the velocity of the particles depending on the temperature temperature.
  • Because of structural limits in the kinesin and spacing of binding sites on the microtubules, the moving head can reach only one possible binding site -- 8 nanometers past the bound head, which temporarily remains attached to the microtubule.
  • The head binds to the new site, moving the kinesin and its cargo about 8 nanometers along the microtubule.
  • The process quickly starts anew with the original two heads in interchanged positions.
  • "Normally, Brownian motion cannot do anything concerted or with directionality, because it is random," Fox explained. "But what happens here is a random process in a system that has asymmetric boundary conditions created by the ATP switching. That makes it possible to get a net directed motion along the microtubule."

    The model described by Fox and post-doctoral colleague Mee Hyang Choi depends on two unique properties of structures at the nanometer-scale: thermal energy can be a robust source of power, and random motion occurs very rapidly.

    "Normally, we would t
    '"/>

    Contact: John Toon
    john.toon@edi.gatech.edu
    404-894-6986
    Georgia Institute of Technology Research News
    3-Jun-2001


    Page: 1 2 3 4

    Related biology news :

    1. Putting energy into heart protection
    2. Putting GPS to work, researchers shed light on road-following by pigeons
    3. Putting genes in a pill
    4. Putting microRNAs in their place
    5. Putting muscle in the nucleus
    6. Putting muscle in the nucleus
    7. Putting a price tag on paradise
    8. Putting medical research on-line to give patients the information they need
    9. Putting Doesnt Pollute, Research Finds
    10. Putting A Price Tag On Pollution
    11. Putting Down Your Roots: How Plants Know To Do It

    Post Your Comments:
    (Date:8/22/2014)... CAEveryone,s heard of the birds and the bees. ... that are being fertilized. The fertilization process for ... communication between the male and female reproductive cells. ... Regensburg, Heidelberg, and Munich, and including Carnegie,s Wolf ... in the chemical signaling process that guides flowering ...
    (Date:8/21/2014)... SHELTON, Conn. , Aug. 21, 2014 ... on the growing mobile commerce market, announced today that ... purchase common stock to be issued in its proposed ... been approved for listing on The Nasdaq Capital Market, ... of the common stock and warrants, and will trade ...
    (Date:8/21/2014)... , Aug. 21, 2014 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- LiveScan ... has agreed to a partnership with Gabriel Health ... fastest growing Certified Nursing Assistant preparatory ... Institute  an exclusive member of Binary,s LiveScan service ... Biometrics will improve its service capabilities by ...
    Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Calcium and reproduction go together 2Nxt-ID Approved for NASDAQ Capital Market Listing 2Nxt-ID Approved for NASDAQ Capital Market Listing 3LiveScan Provider Binary Biometrics Announces Partnership with Preeminent CNA School, Gabriel Health Institute to Expand Services in Orlando Region 2LiveScan Provider Binary Biometrics Announces Partnership with Preeminent CNA School, Gabriel Health Institute to Expand Services in Orlando Region 3
    (Date:8/22/2014)... DUBLIN , Aug. 22, 2014 ... the "Global Molecular Biology Enzymes, Kits, & Reagents ... to 2018" report to their offering. ... at $2,847.63 million in 2013, and is expected to ... million in 2018. Molecular biology enzymes, kits, & reagents ...
    (Date:8/22/2014)... Greenville, SC (PRWEB) August 22, 2014 ... that indisputable acknowledgement is a national disgrace. Furthermore, ... part in establishing the current, deplorable state of ... outlined "5 great mistakes," to merely serve as ... convey the extent of colossal failure(s) that have ...
    (Date:8/21/2014)... research team including DESY scientists has observed tiny quantum ... reports in the journal Science that the ... the nanodroplets. It is the first time that the ... samples of what is known as superfluid helium, have ... best expectations," says Andrey Vilesov of the University of ...
    (Date:8/21/2014)... 21, 2014 Telomere Biosciences, LLC (Telomere ... "TELO-20 for Dogs" with Telomerase Activation Complex ... the world for dogs. Telomeres are the protective ... the body. A wealth of ground-breaking research by ... Science and Aging, including Nobel laureates, has demonstrated ...
    Breaking Biology Technology:Global Molecular Biology Enzymes, Kits, & Reagents (Cloning, Epigenetics, PCR, Restriction Digestion, Sequencing) Market - Forecast to 2018 2Global Molecular Biology Enzymes, Kits, & Reagents (Cloning, Epigenetics, PCR, Restriction Digestion, Sequencing) Market - Forecast to 2018 35 Great Mistakes in Healthcare and How to Fix Them by Dr. Ira Williams 2Scientists observe quantum vortices in cold helium droplets 2Telomere Biosciences Announces: TELO-20 for Dogs, the World's First Telomere-Lengthening Supplement for Dogs, to Promote Healthy Aging and Longevity 2Telomere Biosciences Announces: TELO-20 for Dogs, the World's First Telomere-Lengthening Supplement for Dogs, to Promote Healthy Aging and Longevity 3
    Cached News: