HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Racial differences explored in treatment response for hepatitis C

CHAPEL HILL - The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine has been granted $1.5 million to join seven other medical centers around the country to determine if African-Americans respond less well to anti-viral drug therapy for hepatitis C infection than Caucasians.

Hepatitis C is a serious viral infection of the liver transmitted primarily through infected blood and blood products. Approximately 2.7 million Americans and 170 million people worldwide are chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis C is often described as "silent" because people may be infected for 10 to 30 years and not exhibit symptoms, yet still be carrying the virus. While many patients with hepatitis C will not develop complications from their liver disease, chronic hepatitis C is still a leading cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer and is the major indication for liver transplants in this country.

The VIRAHEP-C clinical trial is funded by the National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. The trial will study the effectiveness of combination therapy with long-acting pegylated interferon alpha-2a (PEGASYS) and ribavirin, an anti-viral medication. A total of 400 patients will be enrolled, equally divided between African-Americans and Caucasians.

The study was prompted in part by statistical analyses of large databases from previous anti-viral studies that suggest racial disparities exist in response to therapy for chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus.

"Major advances have occurred over the last decade in the field of anti-viral therapy for chronic hepatitis C. Unfortunately, response to therapy has not been uniformly favorable across all populations," said Dr. Michael W. Fried, associate professor of medicine and director of clinical hepatology at UNC.

Fried, a principal investigator in the trial, noted that sustained response rates in hepatitis C patients h
'"/>

Contact: Leslie H. Lang
llang@med.unc.edu
919-843-9687
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
15-May-2002


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Racial differences in body composition require modified skinfold-thickness
2. Genetic differences might help distinguish thyroid cancers
3. Study explains spatial orientation differences between sexes
4. Carnegie Mellon U. imaging study reveals sex-based differences that persist as mice enter adulthood
5. Sex-specific differences in gene expression related to drug metabolism and hypertension
6. Young chimpanzees show sex differences in learning
7. Gene differences may alter susceptibility to multiple sclerosis
8. Estrogen promotes gender differences in brains response to stress
9. UB researchers show first evidence of pharmacogenomic differences in patients responses to MS drug
10. Genetic differences in termite castes may lead to better control
11. Genetic basis for gender differences in the liver

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/24/2019)... ... May 24, 2019 , ... The newest edition of ... available on the company’s global website. , Crystallography Times is a monthly electronic newsletter ... It serves the X-ray analysis community by presenting the latest news and crystallographic research. ...
(Date:5/21/2019)... ... May 21, 2019 , ... If a genetically or ... can we tell it apart from the millions of microorganisms that exist naturally ... team, including Eric Young , assistant professor of chemical engineering at Worcester ...
(Date:5/21/2019)... ... May 20, 2019 , ... The ASGCT Clinical Trials ... and cell therapy throughout the United States. Data curated daily from ClinicalTrials.gov ensures the ... , ASGCT members who volunteered to assist in the development of the ASGCT ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 11, 2019 , ... Veterinary Regenerative Medicine company, ... has announced that their GMP facility for cell production is now approved by ... This is an important milestone for VetStem as it expands into contract cell ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... May 30, 2019 , ... World Compliance Seminars today ... 08-09, 2019 in Boston, MA. This peer recommended interactive workshop is always selected ... training will kick off with a compendial treatment of Data Integrity fundamentals. After ...
(Date:5/15/2019)... ... ... Milton Hershey School® has named William Charles Ballough Harding ’78 the 2019 Alumnus ... is changing lives by creating solutions to global healthcare challenges through the development of ... founders – Milton and Catherine Hershey – who always hoped for Milton Hershey School ...
(Date:5/7/2019)... , ... May 06, 2019 , ... ... resource for the growing number of repositories being asked to store cellular products ... to the team of contributors who are world leaders, who have shared their ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: