HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Reduced Nutrients Still Cause Problems In The Neuse And Tar-Pamlico Rivers

Concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen have generally declined since 1980 in streams draining into the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds in North Carolina but remain high enough to cause water-quality problems in the Neuse and Tar-Pamlico Rivers, according to the results of a 5-year investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). These findings are consistent with recent public concerns about Pfiesteria, fishkills, algal growths, and pollutants in these two river basins.

A recently published USGS report indicates that concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen in the Neuse River and Tar River exceed water-quality guidelines that were established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the 1960's. The report summarizes results of 5 years of study and 3 years of data collection as part of the USGS's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA [pronounced nawkwa]) Program.

"Although the water-quality guidelines have been around for many years, they remain relevant by providing some important clues as to why these two rivers seem to have more than their share of water-quality problems," said Tim Spruill, a hydrologist with the USGS. According to the report, a 50-percent reduction in summertime nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in the Neuse River and a 30-percent reduction in the Tar River and Contentnea Creek (a tributary of the Neuse River) might be necessary to attain the water-quality guidelines. "Mid- to late summer is usually when fishkills and nuisance algal blooms occur in rivers and estuaries because environmental conditions are more favorable for rapid algal growths at this time," said Spruill. When algae deplete the nutrients and begin to die, the decomposing cells deplete the oxygen in water. This lack of oxygen often results in the death of fish and other organisms.

Although nutrient concentrations in the Tar and Neuse Rivers in recent years have been linked to agricultural, urban, and industrial sources,
'"/>

Contact: Gerald L. Ryan
glryan@usgs.gov
(919) 571-4000
United States Geological Survey
16-Apr-1998


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Reduced daily eye patching effectively treats lazy eye
2. Reduced-calorie diet adds nearly two years to dogs life span
3. Vions TAPET Organisms Demonstrate Reduced Virulence, Increased Safety While Retaining Ability To Specifically Target Tumors
4. Mice Lacking Gene Show Reduced Alcohol Preference And Sensitivity
5. Marylands Death Rate For Pancreatic Cancer Surgery Reduced By Medical Regionalization
6. Low Cholesterol? Reduced Sodium? What Do These Terms Really Mean?
7. Nutrients cause increase in parasites and frog deformities
8. Study Bolsters Theory Of Plant Nutrients Trapped In Soil
9. Research Sheds Light On How Plants Regulate Distribution Of Nutrients
10. Nutrients, Ground Water, And The Chesapeake Bay - A Link With Pfiesteria?
11. Still waters? Clear-cutting robs the deep-sea of ancient treasures

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/31/2014)... prestin was found to be a key gene responsible for ... the hair cells of the inner ear that contracts and ... an antique phonograph horn, amplify sound waves to make hearing ... in the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and ... has also independently evolved to play a critical role in ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... has long been known that biomass burning ... as a ritual , slash-and-burn agriculture and wildfires ... health. , But until the release of a ... Engineering Professor Mark Z. Jacobson, the degree of ... Jacobson,s research, detailed in a paper published July ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... team of scientists from Spain, France, and the ... that is the oldest definitive member of the ... amber. The discovery and description were made possible ... synchrotron imaging technique, which allows the detailed study ... new species is described in the journal ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 2Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 3Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 4
(Date:8/1/2014)... (PRWEB) August 01, 2014 Testing ... led to a better understanding embryonic development. ... reorganize into structurally and functionally distinct tissues is ... defects. Prof. Todd McDevitt, Melissa Kinney, and ... signals interact with biochemical cues to control many ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... people over 60 are not donor candidates for bone ... time, making the elderly prone to life-threatening infection and ... now has discovered a reason why. , "We have ... blood-forming cells to maintain blood production over time in ... could be restored for rejuvenation therapies," said Emmanuelle Passegu, ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... , July 31, 2014 The SNIS ... with $25,000 to fund a translational research project.  ... 2011, the gift was presented at the Society ... Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO. ... neurointerventional approaches to neurovascular conditions, SNIS formed the ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... , July 31, 2014 ... Market Research "Electrodes for Medical Devices Market (Diagnostic Electrodes ... Therapeutic Electrodes - TENS, Pacemakers, Defibrillators, Electrosurgical and Other ... and Forecast, 2013 - 2019," the global electrodes market ... in 2012 and is estimated to reach a market ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Study Links Biomechanics and Gene Expression in Stem Cells 2Key to aging immune system is discovered 2SNIS Foundation Bestows First Grant Award For Cutting-Edge NeuroInterventional Research 2SNIS Foundation Bestows First Grant Award For Cutting-Edge NeuroInterventional Research 3Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 2Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 3Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 4Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 5Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 6
Cached News: