HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Research reveals a cellular basis for a male biological clock

Researchers at the University of Washington have discovered a cellular basis for what many have long suspected: Men, as well as women, have a reproductive clock that ticks down with age.

A recent study revealed that sperm in men older than 35 showed more DNA damage than that of men in the younger age group. In addition, the older men's bodies appeared less efficient at eliminating the damaged cells, which could pass along problems to offspring.

"When you talk about having children, there has been a lot of focus on maternal age," said Narendra Singh, research assistant professor in the UW Department of Bioengineering and lead researcher on the study. "I think our study shows that paternal age is also relevant."

Charles Muller, with the UW Department of Urology and a collaborator on the study, recently presented the findings at the annual meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine in Seattle.

In the study, researchers recruited 60 men, age 22 to 60, from laboratory and clinical groups. A computerized semen analysis was performed for each of the subjects, looking for breaks in sperm cell DNA and evidence of apoptosis, or cell suicide. Normally, when something goes irreparably wrong in a cell, that cell is programmed to kill itself as a means of protecting the body.

The researchers found that men over age 35 had sperm with lower motility and more highly damaged DNA in the form of DNA double-strand breaks. The older group also had fewer apoptotic cells an important discovery, Singh said.

"A really key factor that differentiates sperm from other cells in the body is that they do not repair their DNA damage," he said. "Most other cells do."

As a result, the only way to avoid passing sperm DNA damage to a child is for the damaged cells to undergo apoptosis, a process that the study indicates declines with age.

"So in older men, the sperm are accumulating more damage, and those severely damaged sperm are
'"/>

Contact: Rob Harrill
rharrill@u.washington.edu
206-543-2580
University of Washington
25-Nov-2002


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Schepens Eye Research Institute receives Roadmap grant to develop center for curing eye diseases
4. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
5. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
6. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
7. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
8. Environmental issues center of Inland Northwest Research Alliance 4th Annual Symposium
9. Research suggests new avenue for stopping, preventing colon cancer
10. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
11. Research on carbohydrate metabolism receives historical recognition

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Research reveals cellular basis for male biological clock

(Date:7/24/2014)... Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have ... the University of East Anglia. , Research published today in ... in plants, yeast and very likely also in animals still ... origin of life some four billion years ago. , ... pond or ocean as a result of the combination of ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Africa in mid-July 2014, as the annual fire season ... areas of increased temperatures, are heavily sprinkled across the ... Congo (northeast), and Zambia (southeast). Thick gray smoke rises ... especially in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, strong ... fire season is an annual event in this region, ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Expanding on his work with a new drug that successfully ... of Houston has received a $250,000 grant to expand his ... effort to treat a wider range of autoimmune diseases., Chandra ... biomedical Engineering at UH, previously published a study in Arthritis ... that successfully treated lupus in mice and reduced the number ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Biomedical engineer looks at new applications for novel lupus drug 2Biomedical engineer looks at new applications for novel lupus drug 3
(Date:7/24/2014)... PARK, Calif. , July 24, 2014 ... seven-year contract with the National Institute of Allergy and ... Health, to conduct preclinical development of potential therapies for ... of drugs to treat HIV and AIDS and the ... well as microbicides for preventing sexual transmission of HIV. ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... 24, 2014 Three companies from the ... Livestrong’s Big C Competition. Out of 700 competition entrants, ... to the semi-final round. In this round twenty teams ... program, complete with mentoring from thought-leaders and medical entrepreneurs ... of the angelMD commitment to the Livestrong vision around ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... -- Neogen Corporation (Nasdaq: NEOG ) advised market ... from new rodenticide research are premature. In its regular ... 22, 2014, Neogen,s CEO commented about several new developments ... "It was my intent Tuesday at our conference call ... type of rodenticide, but certainly not to give any ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... July 24, 2014 1000 balances – ... input on customers’ weighing needs and expertly narrows down ... of balances, scales or even terminals. , First, ... smallest weight (or select readability instead) and define the ... additional selection criteria narrows down the list to models ...
Breaking Biology Technology:National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Awards SRI International Contract to Study New Therapies for HIV and AIDS 2National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Awards SRI International Contract to Study New Therapies for HIV and AIDS 33 angelMD Startups Make Livestrong Big C Semi-finals 2Neogen comments on SenesTech 2
Cached News: