HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Research suggests possible marker, preventive treatment for preeclampsia

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - New research findings suggest a possible marker - and preventive treatment - for preeclampsia, the second leading cause of pre-term birth in the United States.

Researchers from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center (WFUBMC) in Winston-Salem, N.C., and the Pontificia University in Santiago, Chile, said levels of angiotensin-(1-7), a naturally occurring hormone that helps "brake" high blood pressure, increase during normal pregnancies and are low in pregnant women with preeclampsia. The findings were reported at a meeting of the American Heart Association's Council for High Blood Pressure Research.

"While the cause of preeclampsia is currently unknown, this research indicates a possible mechanism for the condition," said David Merrill, M.D., a specialist in obstetrics and maternal/fetal medicine at WFUBMC. "Additional research is needed to show if low levels of angiotensin-(1-7) early in a pregnancy can predict preeclampsia, and if levels can be altered to prevent the disorder."

Preeclampsia, which affects about 5 percent of pregnancies, is characterized by high blood pressure, fluid retention and protein in the urine. In severe cases, untreated preeclampsia can lead to fetal or maternal death. Currently, the only treatment for preeclampsia is pre-term delivery.

K. Bridget Brosnihan, Ph.D., hypertension researcher at WFUBMC, said these were the first studies of the role of angiotensin-(1-7) in pregnancy. The hormone, identified earlier by WFUBMC researchers, causes blood vessels to dilate and is believed to be the body's natural "braking system" against high blood pressure.

In one study, conducted by Brosnihan, Merrill and Michael Karoly, M.D., all of WFUMBC, researchers measured levels of angiotensin-(1-7) in blood samples from three groups of women. The hormone's levels increased by 50 percent in normal pregnancies compared to a non-pregnant control group. In pregnant women with preeclampsia, levels o
'"/>

Contact: Karen Richardson
krchrdsn@wfubmc.edu
336-716-4587
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
24-Oct-2000


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Schepens Eye Research Institute receives Roadmap grant to develop center for curing eye diseases
4. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
5. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
6. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
7. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
8. Environmental issues center of Inland Northwest Research Alliance 4th Annual Symposium
9. Research suggests new avenue for stopping, preventing colon cancer
10. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
11. Research on carbohydrate metabolism receives historical recognition

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/16/2017)... 16, 2017   Bridge Patient Portal , ... MD EMR Systems , an electronic medical ... GE, have established a partnership to build an ... the GE Centricity™ products, including Centricity Practice Solution ... These new integrations will allow healthcare delivery ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... 19, 2017 The global military ... is marked by the presence of several large global ... by five major players - 3M Cogent, NEC Corporation, ... for nearly 61% of the global military biometric market ... the global military biometrics market boast global presence, which ...
(Date:4/13/2017)... April 13, 2017 UBM,s Advanced Design and ... will feature emerging and evolving technology through its 3D ... will run alongside the expo portion of the event ... and demonstrations focused on trending topics within 3D printing ... and manufacturing event will take place June 13-15, 2017 at ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... ... Disappearing forests and increased emissions are the main causes of the evolving air ... living in larger cities are affected by air pollution related diseases. , That is ... globally - decided to take action. , “I knew I had to take action ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... ... October 10, 2017 , ... ... company advancing targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) therapeutics, today confirmed licensing rights that ... Polymerized Liposomal Nanoparticle), a technology developed in collaboration with Children’s Hospital Los ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... , Oct. 10, 2017 SomaGenics announced ... the NIH to develop RealSeq®-SC (Single Cell), expected to ... profiling small RNAs (including microRNAs) from single cells using ... highlights the need to accelerate development of approaches to ... "New techniques for measuring levels of ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... , ... October 09, 2017 , ... The award-winning American ... broadcast first quarter 2018. American Farmer airs Tuesdays at 8:30aET on RFD-TV. , ... faced with the challenge of how to continue to feed a growing nation. At ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: