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Research suggests possible marker, preventive treatment for preeclampsia

f angiotensin-(1-7) were lower than in the pregnant subjects with normal blood pressure.

"These results confirm an increase in angiotensin-(1-7) in normal pregnancy and decreased levels in patients with preeclampsia," said Brosnihan.

In a separate study conducted by Gloria Valdes, M.D., at Pontificia University as well as Brosnihan and Carlos Ferrario, M.D., director of WFUBMC's Hypertension and Vascular Disease Center, researchers looked at whether angiotensin-(1-7) levels could be measured from urine samples.

The results showed that in normal pregnancies, there was a progressive increase in angiotensin-(1-7) beginning at 12-13 weeks gestation and reaching a maximum level at 33-35 weeks. The peak levels were 13 times higher than in non-pregnant women.

"Preeclampsia is one of the major problems in obstetrics," said Merrill. "Understanding the mechanism - and whether these levels can serve as a marker - are the first step in developing preventive therapy."


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Contact: Karen Richardson
krchrdsn@wfubmc.edu
336-716-4587
Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
24-Oct-2000


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