HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Researchers Announce Breakthrough In Transgenic Animal Technology

MADISON - Research reported in the November 24 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences may herald a new era in biopharmaceutical production.

Work performed in the laboratory of former University of Wisconsin-Madison dairy science professor Robert Bremel, and by Gala Design LLC, a Sauk City, Wis. company, has resulted in breakthrough increases in the efficiency of the production of transgenic livestock.

Dairy livestock are seen as key players in the production of genetically engineered protein drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies, hormones, vaccine proteins and enzymes. Introducing new genes into the animals allows them to produce specific pharmaceutical proteins in their milk, from where it can be extracted as a drug component. Costs of producing proteins by this route are far lower than more traditional pharmaceutical production methods, using large culture vessels or bioreactors.

The PNAS article describes a new method of gene introduction that greatly increases the efficiency of production of transgenic cattle. The transgametic method inserts a gene into the unfertilized oocyte or egg, which stably incorporates the gene into the maternal germline. Once the egg is fertilized, all cells of the resulting embryo carry the new gene, and the calf is born with the capability to secrete a new protein in milk. Subsequent generations, offspring of each founder animal, will also carry the desired gene.

Older, less efficient production methods made transgenic livestock very costly. Cloning and pronuclear microinjection typically lead to only 1 percent of animals born carrying the new gene. The new technology also sidesteps problems of gene stability and mosaicism seen with microinjection. When DNA is microinjected into a fertilized embryo, the DNA is often not taken up until cell division has occurred. As a result, only some cell lineages carry the new gene. If the germ or sex cells don't carry the new gene, then the gene isn't rel
'"/>

Contact: Jane Homan
Jane_Homan@gala.com
608-643-0152
University of Wisconsin-Madison
30-Nov-1998


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
4. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
5. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
6. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
7. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
8. Researchers identify distinctive signature for metastatic prostate cancer
9. Researchers report new gene test for isolated cleft lip and palate
10. Researchers discover why mutant gene causes colon cancer
11. Researchers identify the genomes controlling elements

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:4/5/2019)... , ... April 04, 2019 , ... ... with integrated linear encoders providing 0.05 microns and 0.005 microns resolution, respectively. The ... and drive variations are available, from fast DC-servo motors with linear encoders and ...
(Date:4/4/2019)... ... April 02, 2019 , ... The live session ... into the connectivity between product risk management (ISO 14971) and the clinical risk ... process. , With increasing global regulation and reimbursement challenges faced by medical device ...
(Date:4/1/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... April 01, 2019 , ... ... and System for Characterizing Skin Related Conditions” by the US Patent and Trademark ... The patent is an invention by uBiome collaborators Dr. Zachary Apte, Dr. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/9/2019)... ... April 09, 2019 , ... Sonny Bar Lisa, or Sonny ... for approximately two months. After a series of diagnostics, an MRI was performed ... owner, Alison, researched the injury and found that VetStem Regenerative Cell Therapy ...
(Date:4/8/2019)... ... April 08, 2019 , ... US Capital Global ... $15 million preferred equity investment in the privately held pharmaceutical company, S1 Biopharma (“S1”). ... Lorexys, is targeted at female hypoactive sexual dysfunction disorder and is ready to begin ...
(Date:4/4/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... April 03, 2019 , ... ... together through intimate off-the-record collaboration and dialogue, today announces its Boston CEO conference ... offers insights into the industry’s challenges and opportunities with high-level panels and discussions ...
(Date:3/27/2019)... ... March 27, 2019 , ... In honor of National Nutrition Month, ... importance of healthy meals and good nutrition. This month, Chef Jodi Abel appeared ... chef. , The first segment addressed the nutritional value of USDA’s MyPlate, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: