HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Researchers Discover Why Some Athletes' Performances Fail To Improve On A Live-High, Train-Low Regimen

DALLAS - December 30, 1998 - Exercise physiology researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas have learned why certain athletes don't respond to the internationally accepted "live-high, train-low" paradigm. The regimen - essentially living in the thin mountain air while training at lower altitudes to increase athletic endurance - is not effective in athletes unable to produce a sustained amount of a crucial red blood cell-increasing hormone.

"We've figured out some of the differences between the athletes who do and don't respond to altitude training. So now we hope to extend this research and predict who will and who won't respond with a screening test," said Dr. Benjamin Levine, associate professor of internal medicine at UT Southwestern and director of the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine (IEEM) - a collaboration between UT Southwestern and Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas.

Exercise physiologists have known for years that, in most cases, the body responds to high altitude by producing more red blood cells to boost oxygen levels. That formed the basis of Levine's original 1997 study performed in collaboration with Dr. James Stray-Gundersen, a former assistant professor of surgery at UT Southwestern who now works with Norway's Olympic ski team.

The new study was published in the October issue of Journal of Applied Physiology. Levine's team, including Stray-Gundersen and UT Southwestern postdoctoral fellow Dr. Robert Chapman, looked at data from previous altitude studies, specifically, erythropoietin (EPO) concentrations in 39 collegiate runners living at high altitudes. Those who responded to the live-high, train-low regimen showed a significantly larger increase in EPO concentration than the nonresponders. The researchers theorized that this increased EPO concentration allows the body to make more red cells while at high altitudes and that, in turn, increases maximal oxygen uptake, which was shown through higher scores in
'"/>

Contact: Jennifer Haigh-Manley
jhaigh@mednet.swmed.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center
30-Dec-1998


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
4. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
5. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
6. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
7. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
8. Researchers identify distinctive signature for metastatic prostate cancer
9. Researchers report new gene test for isolated cleft lip and palate
10. Researchers discover why mutant gene causes colon cancer
11. Researchers identify the genomes controlling elements

Post Your Comments:
(Date:8/3/2015)... SAN JOSE, Calif. , Aug. 3, 2015 /PRNewswire/ ... developer of human interface solutions, today announced that members ... investment community at the Pacific Crest Global Technology Leadership ... Mountain Time. The conference will be held at the ... The presentation may include forward-looking information. ...
(Date:7/31/2015)... , Chine, 31 juillet 2015 La ... www.icg-10.org ) sera organisée par le BGI du ... Shenzhen en Chine. La ... son inauguration en 2006, l,ICG est devenue l,une ... le domaine des « omiques » et c,est aussi la ...
(Date:7/31/2015)... SHENZHEN, China , July 31, 2015 The ... ) will be held by BGI from October 22-25, 2015, in ... The conference is celebrating its 10 th ... become one of the world,s most influential annual meetings in ... enthusiastic, and enjoyable scientific gatherings. ICG-10 focuses ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):La 10e International Conference on Genomics (ICG-10) doit s'ouvrir en octobre 2La 10e International Conference on Genomics (ICG-10) doit s'ouvrir en octobre 3The 10th International Conference on Genomics (ICG-10) to Open in October 2
(Date:8/26/2015)... After litigating and negotiating patent infringement claims brought ... United States patent RE43,651 (the ,651 patent), ... United States without any admission or concession of ... a result of the parties, settlement, the US District Court ... dismissed the case without prejudice. Under the terms ...
(Date:8/26/2015)... ... August 26, 2015 , ... PRC Clinical, a Clinical ... relationships with local sponsors in southern California. The Clinical Trial Management Expert CRO seeks ... and regulatory pathways., , Stem Cell Meeting on the ...
(Date:8/25/2015)... SHANGHAI , Aug. 25, 2015   WuXi ... open-access R&D capability and technology platform company serving the ... Holdings Ltd. ("Lee,s Pharm," Hong Kong Exchange Stock Code: ... Hong Kong with 20 years of operations ... the two companies have signed an agreement whereby WuXi,s ...
(Date:8/25/2015)... (PRWEB) , ... August 25, 2015 , ... ... at its research facility in Knapp, Wis. The company has added a AS16 ... Fermentor allows detailed data collection during bacterial or fungal fermentation process development. ...
Breaking Biology Technology:P2i Settles United States Litigation 2PRC Clinical To Attend Major Industry Conferences And Meet Sponsor Companies In The San Diego Biotech Hub 2PRC Clinical To Attend Major Industry Conferences And Meet Sponsor Companies In The San Diego Biotech Hub 3WuXi PharmaTech to Be Exclusive Supplier of Laboratory Testing Services to Lee's Pharm 2WuXi PharmaTech to Be Exclusive Supplier of Laboratory Testing Services to Lee's Pharm 3New centrifuge and fermentor expand product development capacity at Vets Plus 2
Cached News: