HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Researchers Discover Why Some Athletes' Performances Fail To Improve On A Live-High, Train-Low Regimen

DALLAS - December 30, 1998 - Exercise physiology researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas have learned why certain athletes don't respond to the internationally accepted "live-high, train-low" paradigm. The regimen - essentially living in the thin mountain air while training at lower altitudes to increase athletic endurance - is not effective in athletes unable to produce a sustained amount of a crucial red blood cell-increasing hormone.

"We've figured out some of the differences between the athletes who do and don't respond to altitude training. So now we hope to extend this research and predict who will and who won't respond with a screening test," said Dr. Benjamin Levine, associate professor of internal medicine at UT Southwestern and director of the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine (IEEM) - a collaboration between UT Southwestern and Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas.

Exercise physiologists have known for years that, in most cases, the body responds to high altitude by producing more red blood cells to boost oxygen levels. That formed the basis of Levine's original 1997 study performed in collaboration with Dr. James Stray-Gundersen, a former assistant professor of surgery at UT Southwestern who now works with Norway's Olympic ski team.

The new study was published in the October issue of Journal of Applied Physiology. Levine's team, including Stray-Gundersen and UT Southwestern postdoctoral fellow Dr. Robert Chapman, looked at data from previous altitude studies, specifically, erythropoietin (EPO) concentrations in 39 collegiate runners living at high altitudes. Those who responded to the live-high, train-low regimen showed a significantly larger increase in EPO concentration than the nonresponders. The researchers theorized that this increased EPO concentration allows the body to make more red cells while at high altitudes and that, in turn, increases maximal oxygen uptake, which was shown through higher scores in
'"/>

Contact: Jennifer Haigh-Manley
jhaigh@mednet.swmed.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center
30-Dec-1998


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
4. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
5. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
6. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
7. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
8. Researchers identify distinctive signature for metastatic prostate cancer
9. Researchers report new gene test for isolated cleft lip and palate
10. Researchers discover why mutant gene causes colon cancer
11. Researchers identify the genomes controlling elements

Post Your Comments:
(Date:10/14/2014)... study published in Cancer Research shows SIRT6—a ... colon cancers—can promote the development of skin cancers by ... survival of sun-damaged skin cells. , Previously considered protective, ... called sirtuins that help regulate genomic stability and prevent ... helps repair DNA damage, which can lead to cancer. ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... leading questions is how to produce enough food to ... Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations predicts ... 40 years to feed a growing global population, and ... in food production. Plants—grains, cereals, fruits, vegetables, and ... Current research must tap into our knowledge of how ...
(Date:10/14/2014)... – October 14, 2014 – Scientists from The Scripps ... the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to lead an ... hemorrhagic fever disease in Africa. The study aims to ... some patients die, while others survive the inflection. ... the basic mechanism of how Lassa fever virus causes ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Two-faced gene: SIRT6 prevents some cancers but promotes sun-induced skin cancer 2Building a bridge from basic botany to applied agriculture 2Building a bridge from basic botany to applied agriculture 3Scripps Research Institute team receives $6.6 million to investigate deadly Lassa virus 2
(Date:10/22/2014)... (PRWEB) October 21, 2014 The ... the inorganic refrigerants market in Americas with analysis ... TOC of the Americas Inorganic Refrigerants Market report, ... provided. This also provides a glimpse of the ... is supported by various tables and figures. ...
(Date:10/22/2014)... San Diego, CA (PRWEB) October 22, 2014 ... laboratory balances from Sartorius, A & D Weighing, ... Sartorius CPA Semi-Micro Balance . The Sartorius ... looking for an affordable high-quality, precise, and user-friendly ... in manufacturing of laboratory equipment, their laboratory balances ...
(Date:10/22/2014)... 2014 /PRNewswire/ - iCo Therapeutics ("iCo" or "the Company") ... for its Oral Amphotericin B program.  The company ... vitro work involving samples from HIV/AIDS patients ... complete pre clinical studies and regulatory filings to ... trial, utilizing approximately $700,000 of funding and technological ...
(Date:10/20/2014)... Oct. 20, 2014 Mapp Biopharmaceutical,s valiant ... antibody therapeutic to fight the Ebola outbreak will ... time-consuming the production of pharmaceuticals can be, according ... said that while some may be taken aback ... those with industry knowledge are well aware of ...
Breaking Biology Technology:The Americas Inorganic Refrigerants Market is estimated to grow to $71.6 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 2The Americas Inorganic Refrigerants Market is estimated to grow to $71.6 million by 2018 - New Report by MicroMarket Monitor 3Pipette.com Launches the Addition of Sartorius CPA Semi-Micro Balance to Their Product Portfolio with Special Promotional Pricing 2Pipette.com Launches the Addition of Sartorius CPA Semi-Micro Balance to Their Product Portfolio with Special Promotional Pricing 3iCo Therapeutics Announces Advancement of Oral Amphotericin B Program 2iCo Therapeutics Announces Advancement of Oral Amphotericin B Program 3Kalorama: ZMapp Highlights Need For Faster Biopharmaceutical Production 2Kalorama: ZMapp Highlights Need For Faster Biopharmaceutical Production 3
Cached News: