HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Researchers Identify Molecule That May Be Key In Pheromone Processing

A research team at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Harvard University has identified a molecule that may be key to the process by which the chemical signals called pheromones are turned into nerve impulses travelling to the brain in rodents. The discovery, which appears in the May 11 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, has two unusual aspects: the molecule is most similar to one that insects use to receive visual signals, and it is produced by a gene that is defective in humans.

"This finding doesn't mean that we all should throw out our expensive perfumes and colognes," says first author Emily Liman, PhD, of the HHMI at MGH. "Instead it suggests that humans probably process pheromones through a different mechanism than most other mammals do." The research team also includes David Corey, PhD, MGH; and Catharine Dulac, PhD, of Harvard University. All team members also are researchers with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Many aspects of animal behavior - particularly those relating to courtship and mating - are known to be controlled by pheromones. Although they are detected via the nose, most pheromones are received by a structure within the nose called the vomeronasal organ (VNO), whereas odors are received by the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). While pheromones are believed to play a role in the timing of women's menstrual cycles, any larger role in human physiology is poorly understood.

Earlier research by Liman, Corey and others has shown that the molecular pathways by which odors are detected in the MOE are not active in the VNO. Similarly, pheromone receptors (molecules on the membrane of a cell that initially receive a chemical signal) recently identified by Dulac are not chemically related to the odor receptors found in the MOE. With this evidence of different mechanisms for the detection of odors and pheromones, interest in discovering how pheromones transmit their signals has been intense. <
'"/>

Contact: Susan McGreevey
smcgreevey@partners.org
617-724-2764
Massachusetts General Hospital
4-May-1999


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
4. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
5. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
6. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
7. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
8. Researchers identify distinctive signature for metastatic prostate cancer
9. Researchers report new gene test for isolated cleft lip and palate
10. Researchers discover why mutant gene causes colon cancer
11. Researchers identify the genomes controlling elements

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/30/2017)... Va. , June 30, 2017 ... leading developer and supplier of face and eye ... ATA Featured Product provider program. ... an innovative way to monitor a driver,s attentiveness ... greatly from being able to detect fatigue and ...
(Date:5/16/2017)... 2017   Bridge Patient Portal , an ... MD EMR Systems , an electronic medical record ... have established a partnership to build an interface ... GE Centricity™ products, including Centricity Practice Solution (CPS), ... These new integrations will allow healthcare delivery networks ...
(Date:4/17/2017)... -- NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ: NXTD ) ("NXT-ID" or ... 2016 Annual Report on Form 10-K on Thursday April 13, 2017 ... ... Investor Relations section of the Company,s website at http://www.nxt-id.com  under ... http://www.sec.gov . 2016 Year Highlights: ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... 2017 , ... Proscia Inc ., a data solutions ... “Pathology is going digital. Is your lab ready?” with Dr. Nicolas Cacciabeve, Managing ... how Proscia improves lab economics and realizes an increase in diagnostic confidence.* ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... granted orphan drug designation to SBT-100, its novel anti-STAT3 (Signal Transducer and Activator ... osteosarcoma. SBT-100 is able to cross the cell membrane and bind intracellular STAT3 ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... Oct. 10, 2017 International research firm Parks Associates ... speak at the TMA 2017 Annual Meeting , October 11 in ... the residential home security market and how smart safety and security products ... Parks Associates: Smart ... "The residential security market ...
(Date:10/9/2017)... ... October 09, 2017 , ... The award-winning American Farmer ... first quarter 2018. American Farmer airs Tuesdays at 8:30aET on RFD-TV. , With ... with the challenge of how to continue to feed a growing nation. At the ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: