HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Researchers closer to defining function of two proteins involved in neurotransmitter release

DALLAS Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas are a step closer to defining the function of two proteins involved in neurotransmitter release, which initiates communication between neurons in the brain.

Findings from the two-part study, published in todays issue of Nature, provides new insight in understanding how the brain functions, which ultimately has broad implications for the development of drug therapy to treat neurological diseases such as Alzheimers and Parkinsons, as well as learning and memory disorders.

This is pure, fundamental research, said Dr. Thomas Sdhof, director of the Center for Basic Neuroscience at UT Southwestern and senior author of the first part of the study. It is essential for understanding various diseases of the nervous system. The premise of our work is the understanding of neurotransmitter release, which is a necessity for understanding brain function and how the brain works.

The researchers bred mice that lacked the brain proteins RIM1a or Rab3A. In part one of the study, the researchers report a change in short-term plasticity in the mice lacking the RIM1α protein compared to other types of mutant mice. In part two of the study, the researchers report a correlation between the RIM1a protein and long-term plasticity. The terms short- and long-term plasticity refer to changes that occur during neurotransmitter release.

We found that the mice lacking the protein were still viable, but there were some deficits in short-term plasticity when changes occur at the synapses for a short period of time. The strength of synaptic transmission determines how we process information. It affects everything from memory to thinking and feeling, said Dr. Susanne Schoch, a postdoctoral research fellow and lead author of the two-part study.

We also found that RIM1a has a central function in neurotransmitter release and is required for long-term plasticity, which is similar to short-term
'"/>

Contact: Amy Shields
Amy.Shields@UTSouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center
16-Jan-2002


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
4. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
5. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
6. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
7. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
8. Researchers identify distinctive signature for metastatic prostate cancer
9. Researchers report new gene test for isolated cleft lip and palate
10. Researchers discover why mutant gene causes colon cancer
11. Researchers identify the genomes controlling elements

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/31/2014)... A hidden hazard lurks beneath many of the ... , The hazard is corrosion in parts of ... failures, leaks and contamination of groundwater, a source ... in nine states have reported many rapidly corroding ... These incidents are generally associated with use of ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... German . , ... a sponge that soaks up liquids. Hence, these highly ... gases. However, loading of many MOFs is inhibited by ... report in Nature Communications that the barriers ... can be prevented by water-free synthesis and storing strategies. ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... Prolonged exposure to loud noise alters how the ... distinguishing speech sounds, according to neuroscientists at The ... paper published this week in Ear and ... how noise-induced hearing loss affects the brain,s recognition ... reaches all corners of the population, affecting an ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):NIST corrosion lab tests suggest need for underground gas tank retrofits 2Free pores for molecule transport 2UT Dallas study reveals effect of loud noises on brain 2
(Date:8/1/2014)... As one of the 10 largest medical ... & Clinical Lab Expo is the place where breakthrough ... to the healthcare world. This year, many of the ... include the latest diagnostic technology in the field of ... biosensors have enabled the development of "labs-on-a-chip" that can ...
(Date:8/1/2014)... , Aug. 1, 2014 Research ... "Global Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Genotyping and Analysis ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130307/600769 Single Nucleotide ... genetic variations of SNPs in the genome of various ... humans. SNP genotyping and analysis technology can analyze thousands ...
(Date:8/1/2014)... ON (PRWEB) August 01, 2014 ... has led to a better understanding embryonic development. ... and reorganize into structurally and functionally distinct tissues ... physical defects. Prof. Todd McDevitt, Melissa Kinney, ... biophysical signals interact with biochemical cues to control ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... not donor candidates for bone marrow transplantation. The immune ... prone to life-threatening infection and other maladies, and a ... reason why. , "We have found the cellular mechanism ... blood production over time in an old organism, and ... rejuvenation therapies," said Emmanuelle Passegu, PhD, a professor of ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Lab-on-a-Chip Technology to Be Featured at 2014 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo 2Lab-on-a-Chip Technology to Be Featured at 2014 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo 3Global Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Genotyping and Analysis Market 2014-2018 2Study Links Biomechanics and Gene Expression in Stem Cells 2Key to aging immune system is discovered 2
Cached News: