HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Researchers identify enzyme essential for battle against bacteria in the intestine

St. Louis, Oct. 1, 1999 -- A paper in today's Science identifies an enzyme essential for the body's daily battle against bacteria in the intestine and possibly in other organs such as the lung and bladder. This work might one day help drug companies design more effective drugs to combat a myriad of diseases, including gingivitis, bladder infections and cystic fibrosis.

"This enzyme activates molecules called defensins, which people always thought were a key line of defense against bacteria. But no one has proven it until this paper," said senior author William C. Parks, Ph.D., associate professor of pediatrics and of cell biology and physiology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

The enzyme, called matrilysin, belongs to a large family of enzymes called matrix metalloproteinases, or MMPs. Implicated in a surprising number of diseases, MMPs chew up proteins in the extracellular matrix, a supportive network surrounding cells.

When matrix-degrading metalloproteinases go overboard, they can cause disease. In osteoarthritis, for example, they are thought to break down cartilage in joints, making it painful and difficult for people to use their hands or walk. In cancer, tumor cells use the enzymes to tear down extracellular matrix, gaining passage into the bloodstream and spreading through the body.

MMPs also play important roles in healthy tissue. They often spur normal growth and healing, shaping embryos and remodeling skin in healing wounds.

The Science paper showed that matrilysin protects the epithelial lining of the intestine by regulating the activity of defensins. This might be a common role for this metalloproteinase in the many places where it is made.

Parks and lead author Carole L. Wilson, Ph.D., research assistant professor of pediatrics at Washington University School of Medicine, began studying matrilysin, which shows up in normal, uninjured
'"/>

Contact: Diane Duke Williams
duke@medicine.wustl.edu
314-286-0111
Washington University School of Medicine
1-Oct-1999


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
4. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
5. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
6. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
7. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
8. Researchers identify distinctive signature for metastatic prostate cancer
9. Researchers report new gene test for isolated cleft lip and palate
10. Researchers discover why mutant gene causes colon cancer
11. Researchers identify the genomes controlling elements

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/30/2014)... is a subject of major interest in neuroscience. ... during the distinct stages of Wallerian degeneration: transcription ... dedifferentiation. Although gene expression responses in the distal ... injury are known, differences in gene expression between ... Dengbing Yao and co-workers from Nantong University, China ...
(Date:7/30/2014)... cells can develop into a multitude of cells types. Researchers ... the specific types of mature cells that make up the ... key seems to be long chains of sugars that dangle ... at the University of California, San Diego, has created synthetic ... can be more easily manipulated to direct the process, they ...
(Date:7/30/2014)... high-resolution map of the carbon stocks stored on ... new and improved methodology used to make the ... carbon economies. The new carbon map also ... provides the critical input to studies of deforestation ... enforcement purposes. The technique includes the determination of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Peru's carbon quantified: Economic and conservation boon 2Peru's carbon quantified: Economic and conservation boon 3
(Date:7/30/2014)... FRANCISCO , July 30, 2014 ... Congress evaluated the safety and efficacy of CSL ... rejection following kidney transplants in highly sensitized patients. ... inhibitor of the complement system. The ... in significant increases in the levels of complement ...
(Date:7/30/2014)... AZ (PRWEB) July 30, 2014 Sales ... the launch of blended sales training programs for companies ... sales training programs used by thousands of salespeople over ... blended sales training program can be customized to address ... , The blended sales training program consists ...
(Date:7/30/2014)... (PRWEB) July 30, 2014 Vycom announces ... of products, designed to meet Factory Mutual (FM) 4910 ... materials such as wet benches, process tools, fume hoods, ... safety and damage to semiconductor wafers used in electronic ... a flame-retardant PVC solution with excellent workability and superior ...
(Date:7/30/2014)... , July 30, 2014   Epic Sciences, ... and develops novel diagnostics to personalize and advance the ... of Gregory T. Lucier as chairman of ... and CEO of Life Technologies (formerly Invitrogen). Mr. Lucier ... Epic commercializes its circulating rare cell analysis platform with ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Study Suggests C1-INH May Aid in Prevention of Antibody-Mediated Rejection Following Kidney Transplant 2Study Suggests C1-INH May Aid in Prevention of Antibody-Mediated Rejection Following Kidney Transplant 3Sales Horizons Launches New Blended Sales Training Programs to Companies Engaged in Complex B2B Sales 2Sales Horizons Launches New Blended Sales Training Programs to Companies Engaged in Complex B2B Sales 3Vycom Announces Flametec® Thermax PVC (FM4910 Listed) For a Variety of Clean Room Applications with Excellent Workability and Aesthetics 2Epic Sciences Appoints Greg Lucier as Chairman of the Board of Directors 2Epic Sciences Appoints Greg Lucier as Chairman of the Board of Directors 3
Cached News: