HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Researchers identify protein that overcomes leptin resistance

BOSTON The identification of a protein that enables the body to overcome resistance to the hormone leptin could help scientists move one step closer to creating a drug therapy to help prevent and treat obesity. The findings, made by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), are reported in the April 16 issue of Developmental Cell.

Nearly all obese individuals are resistant to leptin, the hormone that signals the brain that our appetites are satisfied and we can stop eating. For this reason, explains study co-senior author Barbara Kahn, M.D., Chief of Endocrinology and Metabolism at BIDMC, efforts made several years ago to use leptin in drug form to treat obesity were largely unsuccessful. The majority of obese people actually have high levels of leptin, explains Kahn, who is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. But they are unable to put it to use.

In this new research, Kahn, together with co-senior author Benjamin Neel, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the Cancer Biology Program at BIDMC who studies the biological functions of molecules known as protein-tyrosine phosphatases initially began studying PTP1B (protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B) to determine its role in regulating insulin receptor signaling. We hypothesized that in the absence of the PTP1B protein, you would have increased insulin sensitivity and protection against type 2 diabetes, adds Kahn.

To test this hypothesis, researchers created a group of knockout mice, which lacked the PTP1B protein. As expected, these mice displayed hypersensitivity to insulin under ambient conditions as well as when they were given a glucose test. This made it unambiguous that PTP1B was indeed increasing insulin sensitivity, Neel explains. What was unanticipated, however, was that the [knockout] mice were surprisingly lean.

In fact, when fed a high-fat diet, the PTP1B knockout mice gained much less weight and showed markedly diminished body fat when compared with a grou
'"/>

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@caregroup.harvard.edu
617-632-8063
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
18-Apr-2002


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
4. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
5. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
6. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
7. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
8. Researchers identify distinctive signature for metastatic prostate cancer
9. Researchers report new gene test for isolated cleft lip and palate
10. Researchers discover why mutant gene causes colon cancer
11. Researchers identify the genomes controlling elements

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:1/8/2019)... ... January 07, 2019 , ... ... solutions, is proud to welcome Thomas Kennedy as head of sales and business ... for PureWay. , Mr. Kennedy has previously worked for Johnson & Johnson Medical, ...
(Date:1/4/2019)... ... January 02, 2019 , ... Lifecycle Biotechnologies ... the life science tools and service supplier turned 40 in 2018 and for ... catalog features not just part numbers like most catalogs, but rather, insightful information ...
(Date:12/25/2018)... ... 2018 , ... Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine ... a long-standing computational concept known as “blacklisting,” which is commonly employed as a ... as a filter to single out genetic variations in patient genomes and exomes ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/8/2019)... ... January 08, 2019 , ... The American Society of ... were named by a selection committee made up of industry leaders identified by the ... Development grants are mentored awards created to support ASGCT members designing transformative pilot studies ...
(Date:1/4/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... January 01, 2019 , ... ... first Microbiome Conference at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting January 22-25, 2019 ... conference is invitation-only. , The World Economic Forum Annual Meeting brings together leaders ...
(Date:12/20/2018)... ... ... New Year’s brings reflection and desire to improve for individuals and businesses ... on the horizon, Jim Kasic, president and CEO of Boulder iQ, suggests five resolutions ... Regulation (MDR), digital health, and big data are just a few of the challenges ...
(Date:12/18/2018)... ... December 17, 2018 , ... ABCT , ... biosciences ventures invited to participate in the annual program. Twelve ventures will participate ... and a professional network. All startups receive an entrepreneur coach, access to active ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: