HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Researchers in UGA Vet School discover a mechanism that blocks replication of a retrovirus

A team of scientists led by University of Georgia researchers has discovered a naturally occurring mechanism that blocks a critical step late in retrovirus replication. In the long term, the results could lead to the design of new therapeutic strategies or drugs against retroviruses, which cause diseases such as AIDS and certain leukemias.

Studying a transmissible lung cancer of sheep, the researchers found that the mechanism stops cancer-causing retroviruses from exiting host cells and spreading. Their findings shed new light on how retroviruses evolved and will help explain late steps in the retroviral life cycle.

The findings were published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The team was led by Massimo Palmarini, a virologist at UGA's College of Veterinary Medicine. Co-authors are Manuela Mura, Pablo Murcia and Marco Caporale of UGA; Thomas Spencer of Texas A&M University; and Kunio Nagashima and Alan Rein of the HIV Drug Resistance Program, National Cancer Institute in Frederick, Md.

This particular sheep lung cancer called ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma led to the death of Dolly, the first cloned mammal. It is a chronic problem for the sheep industry in Europe and the United Kingdom.

"The cancer is caused by a retrovirus that passes from sheep to sheep like any other virus, such as the flu," Palmarini said.

Like all viruses, retroviruses insert their genetic material into host cells and then force the host to make copies of the virus. Unlike other viruses, however, retroviruses permanently insert a copy of their genes into the genome of cells they invade.

During evolution, some retroviruses infected host germlines, underwent small changes that allowed the "alien" DNA to reside in the host genome permanently and be inherited by offspring. These so-called "endogenous retroviruses" are usually harmless and cannot orchestrate production of infective virus particles.

"Every she
'"/>

Contact: Massimo Palmarini
Mpalmari@vet.uga.edu
706-542-4784
University of Georgia
19-Jul-2004


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
4. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
5. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
6. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
7. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
8. Researchers identify distinctive signature for metastatic prostate cancer
9. Researchers report new gene test for isolated cleft lip and palate
10. Researchers discover why mutant gene causes colon cancer
11. Researchers identify the genomes controlling elements

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/25/2020)... ... 2020 , ... eClinical Solutions LLC , a leading ... drug development, is collaborating with Karyopharm Therapeutics (Nasdaq: KPTI ) on randomized ... COVID-19. This is the first study of an XPO1 inhibitor in patients with ...
(Date:6/23/2020)... ... June 22, 2020 , ... The field of quantitation of large ... (LBA) have dominated this area. However, the use of mass spectrometry in this field ... necessitates the question “How do you choose which approach to use (LBA or MS)?” ...
(Date:6/19/2020)... ... June 16, 2020 , ... The director of stem ... that if the stem cell medicine and pharmaceutical industries have easier access to stem ... So, starting July 5 of this year, Independence Day weekend in the U.S., Asymmetrex ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:7/31/2020)... ... July 30, 2020 , ... ... life sciences industry, today announced the release of its signature product called ... Science Liaisons (MSLs) and other field medical professionals. , Beacon helps ...
(Date:7/18/2020)... ... July 16, 2020 , ... “We are thrilled to deliver this ... the only technology of its kind on the market and we were pleased that ... protective capacity of traditional cultured ingredients, creating a natural way to extend the shelf ...
(Date:7/10/2020)... , ... July 08, 2020 , ... ... and products, announces a significant expansion of laboratory operations through its COVID-19 ... agencies implementing testing programs. , Bode-CARES provides a turnkey solution ...
(Date:7/10/2020)... ... July 09, 2020 , ... Sentien ... announced the hiring of Allen R. Nissenson, M.D., F.A.C.P., as its Chief Medical ... development of Sentien’s lead product, SBI-101. Dr. Nissenson serves as an Emeritus ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: