HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Researchers show 'clot-busting' at stroke site is viable option

COLUMBUS, Ohio A small Ohio study has offered the first published evidence that aggressively treating brain blood clots at their source soon after symptoms start can produce a good outcome for many stroke patients.

In the study, published in a recent issue of the journal Neurosurgery, 50 percent of stroke patients had little or no neurological disability one to three months after clot-dissolving medication was delivered directly to the site of the blockages, compared to 39 percent of patients with similarly good outcomes documented in a large national trial of intravenous (IV) drug treatment for stroke. In all cases, time was an issue: The drugs in both trials were administered within three hours of the onset of symptoms.

"The results tell us what many of us suspected that targeting the problem and delivering drugs right to the problem is a better option for appropriate stroke patients," said Eric Bourekas, an interventional neuroradiologist at Ohio State University Medical Center and lead author of the study.

Researchers at OSU Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University compared patient outcomes from their institutions to the outcomes reported in 1995 after a study led by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. In that large trial, patients who were treated intravenously with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) within three hours of symptom onset were at least 30 percent more likely to have good outcomes compared to patients on placebo. That study led to the intravenous use of rt-PA as the only federally approved clot-dissolving treatment of ischemic stroke the roughly 80 percent of strokes caused by blockage of a blood vessel.

The two Ohio centers treated hundreds of stroke patients using the intra-arterial (IA) method of drug delivery over the time period observed, between 1993 and 2002, but only 36 patients received the medication within three hours after symptoms began, matching
'"/>

Contact: Emily Caldwell
caldwell.151@osu.edu
614-293-3737
Ohio State University
18-Jun-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
4. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
5. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
6. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
7. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
8. Researchers identify distinctive signature for metastatic prostate cancer
9. Researchers report new gene test for isolated cleft lip and palate
10. Researchers discover why mutant gene causes colon cancer
11. Researchers identify the genomes controlling elements

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Researchers show clot busting stroke site viable option

(Date:12/11/2014)... , Dec. 10, 2014  That blood pressure plays a role ... Hypertension – the medical term for high blood pressure – ... and the inflatable cuff that,s used in measuring blood pressure ... there,s nothing new about hypertension, its triggers and its effects. ...
(Date:12/10/2014)... , Dec. 8, 2014 You,ve been here before: you ... remember your password, site key or the answer to your secret ... Today, Hoyos Labs , a digital infrastructure ... an end to the frustration that comes with usernames, passwords and ...
(Date:12/10/2014)...  Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center today announced plans for a ... for this $50 million capital project is part of a ... The medical education building will be located ... adjacent to 525@vine in Wake Forest Innovation Quarter. Construction will ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Research points to need for new approaches to treatment of high blood pressure 2Research points to need for new approaches to treatment of high blood pressure 3Research points to need for new approaches to treatment of high blood pressure 4The Password is Finally Dead: Launch of 1U Mobile App Eliminates Need for All Usernames and Passwords 2The Password is Finally Dead: Launch of 1U Mobile App Eliminates Need for All Usernames and Passwords 3Wake Forest Baptist to Build New Medical Education Facility In Wake Forest Innovation Quarter 2Wake Forest Baptist to Build New Medical Education Facility In Wake Forest Innovation Quarter 3Wake Forest Baptist to Build New Medical Education Facility In Wake Forest Innovation Quarter 4
(Date:1/23/2015)... (PRWEB) January 23, 2015 Portal Solutions ... digital workplaces on Microsoft Office 365 and SharePoint platforms ... 50 Award program for being one of the region’s fastest-growing ... and employee growth. , “To be recognized a second ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... Jan. 22, 2015  Transwestern | RBJ today announces the firm ... space for Shire a leading biopharmaceutical company, at Two Ledgemont ... RBJ,s Robert Richards , president, and Brian Cohen ... the entire five-floor building at 95 Hayden Ave. ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... Diego, California (PRWEB) January 22, 2015 ... Promotional Offer to their comprehensive portfolio of Eppendorf ... allows customers to purchase a Centrifuge 5424/5424 R and ... Bundle of either Eppendorf Research plus or Eppendorf Reference ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... 2015 Diagenode, Inc., a leading ... Bioruptor® and complete solutions for epigenetics research, recently ... alleviating the need for manual processing. The new ... ChIP of histones or transcription factors and a ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Washington SmartCEO Announces Portal Solutions as 2015 Future 50 Award Winner Second Year in a Row 2Washington SmartCEO Announces Portal Solutions as 2015 Future 50 Award Winner Second Year in a Row 3Transwestern?RBJ Advises Shire in 202,000 SF Lease, Creating Boston's Largest Suburban Biotech Campus 2Eppendorf Announces Promotional Bundle Which Includes: Eppendorf Centrifuge 5424, 3-Pack of Pipettes, and Tips - Available Now at Pipette.com 2Diagenode Launches Unique Semi-Automated Solution for Chromatin Immunoprecipitation 2
Cached News: