HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Researchers uncover biochemical connection between high-fat diets and increased colon-cancer risk

DALLAS May 17, 2002 Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas have uncovered what could be a key clue in tracing the connection between high-fat diets and increased colon-cancer risk.

Their findings, published in todays edition of Science, reveal that the bodys natural mechanisms arent built to handle lithocholic acid, a toxic byproduct of dietary fat, in the volume generated by high-fat diets.

Dr. David Mangelsdorf, professor of pharmacology and investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) at UT Southwestern, said observational evidence established a strong association between high-fat diets and colorectal cancer, but scientists could not explain the biological and biochemical mechanisms that formed the link.

The rate of colorectal cancer is much higher in the United States - where a high-fat diet is common - than in Japan, where people dont eat a lot of fat and colorectal cancer is almost nonexistent. But no one has understood why that is, he said.

The new findings show that at least part of the answer lies in the bodys inability to cope with large amounts of lithocholic acid, produced when the body processes cholesterol. The body produces bile acids when it breaks down cholesterol, part and parcel of dietary fat. Those bile acids go to the small intestine and are broken down into secondary bile acids, one of which is lithocholic acid.

Most secondary bile acids circulate to the liver, but only a little bit of lithocholic acid does so. Much of it remains in the small intestine, then moves into the colon, or large intestine.

Lithocholic acid is highly toxic, and it builds up in a high-fat diet, Mangelsdorf said. We dont know how it causes cancer; but it is known to cause cancer in mice, and people with colon cancer have high concentrations of it.

Scientists knew that a certain receptor controlled the small amount of lithocholic acid in the liver. Receptors are proteins that bind to
'"/>

Contact: Wayne Carter
Wayne.Carter@UTSouthwestern.edu
214-648-3404
UT Southwestern Medical Center
16-May-2002


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Researchers determine genetic cause of Timothy syndrome
2. Researchers find color sensitive atomic switch in bacteria
3. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
4. Researchers devise potent new tools to curb ivory poaching
5. Researchers create nanotubes that change colors, form nanocarpet and kill bacteria
6. Researchers ID chlorophyll-regulating gene
7. Researchers develop fast track way to discover how cells are regulated
8. Researchers identify distinctive signature for metastatic prostate cancer
9. Researchers report new gene test for isolated cleft lip and palate
10. Researchers discover why mutant gene causes colon cancer
11. Researchers identify the genomes controlling elements

Post Your Comments:
(Date:5/11/2015)... 11, 2015  Through a well-rounded UAS delegation representing private ... a strong showing at AUVSI,s Unmanned 2015 conference last week ... Ohio,s UAS industry met with over 200 ... points along the UAS ecosystem. "Our message ... President for Aerospace Rich Knoll . "If you want ...
(Date:5/10/2015)... , May 11, 2015 Fingerprint Cards ... FPC1025 and FPC1155 from the distributor World Peace Industrial Group ... distributors in Asia . Deliveries are planned ... be used by smartphone manufacturers in China ... the communicated revenue guidance of + 1 000 MSEK for 2015. ...
(Date:5/7/2015)... Sweden , May 7, 2015 ... touch fingerprint sensors, FPC1022 and FPC1035, FPC,s smallest ... and FPC1035 are mainly considered for integration on ... size gives smartphone OEMs increased possibilities to integrate ... The decreased size also improves possibilities for module ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Ohio Flies High at Unmanned '15, Sets Stage for Ohio UAS Conference 2Fingerprint Cards Receives Touch Fingerprint Sensor Order of SEK 235 Million 2FPC Introduces its Smallest Touch Fingerprint Sensors to Date 2
(Date:5/22/2015)... Charm Sciences, Inc. is pleased to ... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) has ... to monitor aflatoxin in grains utilizing Charm’s ROSA ... Aflatoxin Quantitative Test (solvent-based). , The Charm ... Extraction Technology to extract aflatoxin from the sample ...
(Date:5/21/2015)... 2015 Specialty Pharmacy Times has ... admitted to BPA Worldwide as a business publication ... audience data for Specialty Pharmacy Times based on ... becoming a member of BPA Worldwide, Specialty Pharmacy ... clients with the most reliable, unequaled data,” said ...
(Date:5/21/2015)... Imagine being able to probe and truly ... Being able to read faces and enjoy genuine invisible ... their thoughts and actions like never before. Use ... unique abstract paintings and video, or, play a completely ... as it creates action, dialog, and outcomes based on ...
(Date:5/21/2015)... 2015 Research and Markets ( ... "2015 Global Survey on Flow Cytometry Adoption ... The primary goal of this research is to ... reagents. Key information the survey seeks to collect ... cytometers, predominantly used applications for flow cytometers, respondents, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:USDA-GIPSA (FGIS) Awards 5 Year Contract for Aflatoxin Tests to Charm Sciences 2Specialty Pharmacy Times Joins BPA Worldwide 25 Days to Meet ARGUS - The World's First Contactless Emotions Scanner 2Global Survey on Flow Cytometry Adoption Trends 2015 2
Cached News: