HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Role Of Protein Linked To Colon Cancer Identified, Offering Potential Target For Therapy

UC San Francisco researchers have determined how a protein already strongly associated with colon cancer actually exacts its toll, offering a potential new target for drug therapy.

In their study, published in the April 1 issue of Nature, the investigators report that a protein known as beta catenin gives colon cells the internal nudge they need to circumvent a molecular checkpoint that normally regulates the cycle of cell growth. By evading the checkpoint, known as retinoblastoma (Rb), colon cells proceed to divide uncontrollably and excessively, a hallmark of cancer.

"We've known for several years that colon cancers have high levels of this protein, and that it almost certainly drives the cancer," said the senior author of the study, Frank McCormick, Ph.D., F.R.S., director of the UCSF Cancer Research Institute. "The question has been, `how the heck it does it.'"

A conundrum for researchers has been the fact the retinoblastoma checkpoint remains intact in colon cancer cells.

"Probably every human cancer has a defect in the retinoblastoma checkpoint, and it is this defect that allows cells to grow under conditions that would be forbidden in normal cells," said McCormick. "In colon cancer, it's been known for years that the checkpoint is intact. We've determined that colon cancers have found a way around the checkpoint."

McCormick and Osamu Tetsu, M.D., Ph.D., a visiting postdoctoral fellow in McCormick's lab, determined that beta catenin disrupts cell regulation by synthesizing cyclin D1, a protein that prompts cells to enter S-phase, the point at which a cell duplicates its DNA, in preparation for cell division. "High levels of cyclin D1 override the checkpoint," said McCormick. "This explains how the cells proliferate out of control even though the checkpoint remains intact."

The finding, said McCormick, should fuel ongoing efforts by pharmaceutical companies to develop ways to block beta catenin, which plays a direct causal r
'"/>

Contact: Jennifer O'Brien
jobrien@pubaff.ucsf.edu
415-476-2557
University of California - San Francisco
1-Apr-1999


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Protein is key to fatal disorder and normal cell function
2. Protein is key for digestive function of the pancreas
3. Proteins show promise for mosquito control
4. Protein involved in childhood disorder linked to cancer
5. Protein fishing in America: The movie
6. Protein vaccine fully protects mice from lethal aerosol challenge with ricin toxin
7. Protein key to trafficking in nerve terminals
8. Protein controls acid in cells by direct detection of volume changes, study finds
9. Protein believed to control formation of memory identified by Scripps & UCSD scientists
10. Protein stops blood-vessel growth, holds promise as cancer therapy
11. Proteins transform DNA into molecular velcro

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:1/19/2017)... 2017 Sensory Inc ., a ... for consumer electronics, and i nnerCore ... cybersecurity solutions, today announced a global partnership that ... worldwide to bolster security of data sensitive mobile ... authentication platforms they offer, innerCore now offers its ...
(Date:1/12/2017)... DIEGO , Jan. 12, 2017  Trovagene, Inc. ... tumor DNA (ctDNA) technologies, today announced that it has ... Europe and the Middle East ... tests.  This milestone marks the first wave of international ... for urine and blood samples. The initial ...
(Date:1/11/2017)... N.J. , Jan. 11, 2017  Michael Johnson, co-founder of ... Venture Capital Group, Inc., has been named to the elite "Forbes ... 27,  was one of 600 people in 20 fields nationwide to ... percent of the 15,000 applicants were selected. ... He is currently a PhD candidate at ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/19/2017)... ... 19, 2017 , ... November Research Group, LLC, a global ... device manufacturers and regulators, is proud to announce the worldwide release of PRIMO ... to provide product vigilance departments with the flexibility and ease of use of ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... 2017 AquaBounty Technologies, Inc. (AIM: ABTU; NASDAQ: ... aquaculture and a majority-owned subsidiary of Intrexon Corporation (NYSE: ... the listing of its common shares on the NASDAQ ... "AquaBounty,s listing on NASDAQ represents an important ... to the U.S. markets as we advance plans for ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... Island, NY (PRWEB) , ... January 19, 2017 , ... ... at an exponential rate. The tremendous growth is accounted to two main factors. ... the table and the expanding network of vendors supplying FireflySci products all around the ...
(Date:1/19/2017)... BETHESDA, Md. , Jan. 18, 2017  Northwest ... company developing DCVax® personalized immune therapies for operable and ... Marnix Bosch , Chief Technical Officer of NW Bio, ... Thursday, January 19, 2017, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel ... Dr. Bosch will chair the session entitled "New Therapeutic ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: