HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Role Of Protein Linked To Colon Cancer Identified, Offering Potential Target For Therapy

UC San Francisco researchers have determined how a protein already strongly associated with colon cancer actually exacts its toll, offering a potential new target for drug therapy.

In their study, published in the April 1 issue of Nature, the investigators report that a protein known as beta catenin gives colon cells the internal nudge they need to circumvent a molecular checkpoint that normally regulates the cycle of cell growth. By evading the checkpoint, known as retinoblastoma (Rb), colon cells proceed to divide uncontrollably and excessively, a hallmark of cancer.

"We've known for several years that colon cancers have high levels of this protein, and that it almost certainly drives the cancer," said the senior author of the study, Frank McCormick, Ph.D., F.R.S., director of the UCSF Cancer Research Institute. "The question has been, `how the heck it does it.'"

A conundrum for researchers has been the fact the retinoblastoma checkpoint remains intact in colon cancer cells.

"Probably every human cancer has a defect in the retinoblastoma checkpoint, and it is this defect that allows cells to grow under conditions that would be forbidden in normal cells," said McCormick. "In colon cancer, it's been known for years that the checkpoint is intact. We've determined that colon cancers have found a way around the checkpoint."

McCormick and Osamu Tetsu, M.D., Ph.D., a visiting postdoctoral fellow in McCormick's lab, determined that beta catenin disrupts cell regulation by synthesizing cyclin D1, a protein that prompts cells to enter S-phase, the point at which a cell duplicates its DNA, in preparation for cell division. "High levels of cyclin D1 override the checkpoint," said McCormick. "This explains how the cells proliferate out of control even though the checkpoint remains intact."

The finding, said McCormick, should fuel ongoing efforts by pharmaceutical companies to develop ways to block beta catenin, which plays a direct causal r
'"/>

Contact: Jennifer O'Brien
jobrien@pubaff.ucsf.edu
415-476-2557
University of California - San Francisco
1-Apr-1999


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Protein is key to fatal disorder and normal cell function
2. Protein is key for digestive function of the pancreas
3. Proteins show promise for mosquito control
4. Protein involved in childhood disorder linked to cancer
5. Protein fishing in America: The movie
6. Protein vaccine fully protects mice from lethal aerosol challenge with ricin toxin
7. Protein key to trafficking in nerve terminals
8. Protein controls acid in cells by direct detection of volume changes, study finds
9. Protein believed to control formation of memory identified by Scripps & UCSD scientists
10. Protein stops blood-vessel growth, holds promise as cancer therapy
11. Proteins transform DNA into molecular velcro

Post Your Comments:
(Date:1/22/2015)... , Jan. 21, 2015  Analyst Report Issued by Small ... Brands report showed that planet-wide, transactions at merchants on the ... the total number of credit, debit, and prepaid cards reached ... were victims of fraudulent card usage in 2012, and credit ...
(Date:1/22/2015)... Infinisource has launched its new NXG series of time clocks ... a higher standard for collecting attendance and labor data and ... installation, touch screen interface and seamless connection to cloud-based iSolved, ... solution for the small to mid-size employer. The ...
(Date:12/22/2014)... DENVER , Dec. 22, 2014  The 2014 Holiday ... industry as Acuity Market Intelligence reports that the long ... Acuity forecasts that intensifying demand for smart phones, tablets, ... a global market of 2.5 billion users with nearly ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):$4.80 Near Term Price Target with "Buy" given by CapRock Research for NXT-ID, Inc. (NASDAQ: NXTD) issued by Small Cap IR 2Infinisource's NXG series sets new time clock standard 2First Season of Holiday Shopping with Mobile Biometric Payments Wraps Up With a Present for Biometrics Industry: A Rosy Forecast for More Than 2 Billion Users of 4.8 Billion Mobile Biometric Devices by 2020 2
(Date:1/22/2015)... BRUNSWICK , Nueva Jersey , 22 de ... Award for Biomedical Research abre hoy su llamada a ... personas cuya investigación científica ha hecho, o tiene el ... la salud humana. Las nominaciones se aceptarán hasta el ...
(Date:1/22/2015)...   GenoSpace , a precision medicine software company that has ... use of genomic, imaging and other biomedical data in research ... Munson , CEO of Aspera, an IBM Company, to its ... http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20150122/170713 "We are pleased to welcome ...
(Date:12/24/2014)...  United Therapeutics Corporation (NASDAQ: UTHR ) announced ... has submitted a pre-market approval application to the U.S. ... Medtronic,s SynchroMed ® II implantable drug infusion system ... Therapeutics, Remodulin ® (treprostinil) Injection delivered intravenously to ...
(Date:12/24/2014)... 24, 2014   BioLife Solutions , Inc. (NASDAQ: ... clinical grade hypothermic storage and cryopreservation freeze ... cells and tissues  ("BioLife" or the "Company"), today announced that ... May 4, 2015 (the "Annual Meeting"). Because the ...
Breaking Biology Technology:El Dr. Paul Janssen Award for Biomedical Research emite su llamada a los nominados para 2015 2El Dr. Paul Janssen Award for Biomedical Research emite su llamada a los nominados para 2015 3El Dr. Paul Janssen Award for Biomedical Research emite su llamada a los nominados para 2015 4GenoSpace Expands Board with Appointment of Michelle Munson 2United Therapeutics Announces Submission Of Pre-Market Approval Application For Implantable Drug Infusion System To Deliver Remodulin 2United Therapeutics Announces Submission Of Pre-Market Approval Application For Implantable Drug Infusion System To Deliver Remodulin 3United Therapeutics Announces Submission Of Pre-Market Approval Application For Implantable Drug Infusion System To Deliver Remodulin 4BioLife Solutions Sets Date for Annual Meeting of Stockholders 2
Cached News: