HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Satellite imagery pinpoints El Niño's disruption of marine ecosystem

WASHINGTON -- While evidence of the 1997-1998 El Niño was readily apparent on land--with storms and flooding that caused millions of dollars in damage--new studies have detailed El Niño's extensive consequences in the ocean environment. New evidence produced by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, shows that warm, nutrient-depleted waters ushered in during the El Niño resulted in a reduction in phytoplankton--the plants that are the base of the marine ecosystem.

Using high resolution, color-sensitive images from U.S. and Japanese satellites, Mati Kahru and Greg Mitchell report in the September 15 issue of Geophysical Research Letters that the 1997-1998 event--one of the strongest El Niños on record--supplanted the normal upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich waters in the California Current System.

"When El Niño suppresses the availability of nutrients in the sunlit surface waters, the abundance of phytoplankton declines," said Greg Mitchell, research biologist in the Marine Research Division at Scripps. "Phytoplankton communities are the primary producers for the ocean, comparable to grasslands for terrestrial systems. Success of fish population recruitment, and therefore commercial fisheries, may in part depend on interannual cycles of nutrient and phytoplankton distributions associated with El Niño and La Niña."

The authors argue that one of El Niño's effects on the California Current System is both a reduction and a more uniform distribution of phytoplankton, which results in a critical reduction in the high-concentration patches of phytoplankton that may be necessary for success in the planktonic stages of fish populations.

While Kahru and Mitchell documented reductions in satellite estimates of surface phytoplankton for water off central and southern California, they found a significant increase off Baja California. "These
'"/>

Contact: Harvey Leifert
hleifert@agu.org
202-777-7507
American Geophysical Union
5-Sep-2000


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Satellites are tracing Europes forest fire scars
2. Satellites map volcanic home of Africas endangered gorillas
3. Satellites spy deaths in rain forests (Clark et al.)
4. Satellites will join search for source of Ebola virus
5. Satellites to focus on UNESCO World Heritage sites
6. Satellites see big changes since 1980s in key element of oceans food chain
7. Satellite data to predict plankton blooms by analyzing ocean color
8. Satellites tracking climate changes
9. Satellites vs. mosquitoes: Tracking West Nile Virus in the U.S.
10. Fatal attraction: Satellites to determine sea lions deaths
11. Satellite fire alarms keep watch on raging California fires

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/23/2017)... and ITHACA, N.Y. , June ... Cornell University, a leader in dairy research, today announced ... designed to help reduce the chances that the global ... onset of this dairy project, Cornell University has become ... Sequencing the Food Supply Chain, a food safety initiative ...
(Date:5/23/2017)... May 23, 2017  Hunova, the first robotic gym for the rehabilitation ... officially launched in Genoa, Italy . The first 30 ... and the USA . The technology was developed and ... by the IIT spin-off Movendo Technology thanks to a 10 million euro ... Release, please click: ...
(Date:5/16/2017)... 16, 2017   Bridge Patient Portal , ... MD EMR Systems , an electronic medical ... GE, have established a partnership to build an ... the GE Centricity™ products, including Centricity Practice Solution ... These new integrations will allow healthcare delivery ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... October 11, 2017 , ... ... any gene in its endogenous context, enabling overexpression experiments and avoiding the use ... with small RNA guides is transformative for performing systematic gain-of-function studies. , ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... and LAGUNA HILLS, Calif. , Oct. ... Cancer Research, London (ICR) and University ... SKY92, SkylineDx,s prognostic tool to risk-stratify patients with multiple myeloma ... MUK nine . The University of Leeds ... partly funded by Myeloma UK, and ICR will perform the ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... Angeles, CA (PRWEB) , ... ... ... Inc., a development-stage cancer-focused pharmaceutical company advancing targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) therapeutics, ... uses of targeted HPLN (Hybrid Polymerized Liposomal Nanoparticle), a technology developed in ...
(Date:10/10/2017)... SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA (PRWEB) , ... October 10, ... ... risk management, technological innovation and business process optimization firm for the life sciences ... the BoxWorks conference in San Francisco. , The presentation, “Automating GxP ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: