HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Scientists Sequence Chlamydia Trachomatis Genome

Researchers in California supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) have completed sequencing the Chlamydia trachomatis genome, providing new insights into chlamydial infection, the most prevalent bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the United States and a major cause of STDs worldwide. C. trachomatis also is the etiologic agent of ocular trachoma, the leading cause of preventable blindness in the developing world. A report describing the project appears in the Oct. 23, 1998 issue of Science.

This project was a collaborative effort between scientists at the University of California at Berkeley, the University of California at San Francisco, and the DNA Sequencing and Technology Center at Stanford University. Richard S. Stephens, Ph.D., M.P.H., primary investigator of the project, led the microbiology team at the University of California at Berkeley, and Ronald Davis, Ph.D., led the sequencing effort at Stanford. The sequenced genome has already been entered into a new on-line database, the STD Relational Database (http://www.stdgen.lanl.gov), funded by NIAID and designed to accelerate research on STDs.

"Their accomplishment has important implications for vaccine development," comments Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of NIAID. "The genome sequence has revealed surface proteins about which we knew nothing, and the organism's unique biochemical pathways provide promising new leads for developing antibiotics."

More than 4 million new cases of chlamydial infection occur in the United States each year, and associated medical costs are estimated to exceed $2 billion. Control of chlamydial infection is complicated by the frequency of asymptomatic disease, the cost and complexity of many available diagnostic tests, and the inadequacy of prevention and control programs.

In women, 20 to 40 percent of untreated or inadequately treated chlamydial infections resul
'"/>

Contact: Laurie K. Doepel
ldoepel@nih.gov
301-402-1663
NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
22-Oct-1998


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Scientists to prototype cyberinfrastructure for research and education access to ocean observatories
2. Scientists sequence genome of kind of organism central to biospheres carbon cycle
3. Scientists find nanowires capable of detecting individual viruses
4. Scientists discover potential new way to control drug-resistant bacteria
5. Scientists explore genome of methane-breathing microbe
6. Scientists decipher genetic code of biothreat pathogen
7. Stuck on you: Scientists lay bare secrets of bacterial attachment proteins
8. Scientists discover proteins involved in spread of HIV-1 infection
9. Scientists fear new Ebola outbreak may explain sudden gorilla disappearance
10. Scientists reinvent DNA as template to produce organic molecules
11. Scientists visualise cellular handmaiden that restores shape to proteins

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:12/25/2018)... , ... December 24, 2018 , ... ... The Rockefeller University have discovered a new use for a long-standing computational concept ... spam control, blocking unwanted files and messages. Using blacklisting as a filter to ...
(Date:12/20/2018)... TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. (PRWEB) , ... December 20, ... ... have been enhanced through upgraded processes and the completion of a new usability/observation ... Evaluations with the goal of ensuring medical devices and drug delivery devices/combination products ...
(Date:12/19/2018)... ... ... InTouchMD’s flagship product, Pulse , has been honored by PM360 as ... featuring the recognition in its 7th annual Innovations issue, created for purpose of recognizing ... device industries. , “This recognition comes at an exciting time for Pulse as we’re ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/4/2019)... PARK, N.C. (PRWEB) , ... January 04, 2019 ... ... organization, is pleased to welcome Ted Hoffman to the firm. Ted will be ... years of experience working in and providing consulting services to the pharmaceutical industry. ...
(Date:12/19/2018)... (PRWEB) , ... December 19, 2018 , ... ... procedures at its first rate Stem Cell Training Course in Las Vegas. Training ... women. As regenerative procedures explode in popularity nationwide for aesthetics, having the training ...
(Date:12/14/2018)... , ... December 14, 2018 , ... ... Canada Inc., have been given the green light to immediately begin a clinical ... (AMD). , The medical devices bureau of Health Canada has granted what is ...
(Date:12/10/2018)... ... December 10, 2018 , ... ... and Manufacturing Organization (CDMO) with sites in China and the United States, ... aseptic fill finish solutions for monoclonal antibody (mAb) and antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: