HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
'Search and destroy' protein turns tables on HIV

MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL -- A human protein that mutates the AIDS virus (HIV) and holds potential for keeping the disease at bay has been discovered and its function described by a team led by Reuben Harris of the University of Minnesota. The new protein (called APOBEC3F) and one described previously (APOBEC3G) can directly mutate HIV. Such proteins--called retroviral restrictors--may contribute to HIV resistance in some people. Harris, an assistant professor of biochemistry, molecular biology and biophysics, and colleagues at the university report the discovery in a paper to be published online June 24 in the journal Current Biology.

In an individual infected with HIV, the virus uses the human cellular machinery to assemble new viral particles. But sometimes those particles contain time bombs: human APOBEC proteins that hitch a ride in the particles and mutate the virus' genetic material after it has infected a new host cell.

Unfortunately for us, the AIDS virus has evolved a counterdefense. It produces a protein called VIF (viral infectivity factor), which triggers the destruction of the retroviral restrictors, thereby preventing mutations from occurring. What scientists don't know is whether some HIV-resistant people have forms of the retroviral restrictor proteins that can evade VIF and avoid destruction.

When DNA from the HIV virus is inserted into the human genome, it sometimes bears the scars of encounters with the APOBEC proteins. The two proteins leave different mutational "signatures," and the signature of APOBEC3F occurs more often.

This, said Harris, indicates that it might be less vulnerable to the virus' VIF counterdefense. Indeed, using a model HIV system, Harris and colleagues showed that APOBEC3F was less susceptible to VIF than APOBEC3G. Moreover, said Harris, the two proteins can account for all the anti-HIV mutational signatures apparent in HIV DNA of AIDS patients. But what function the proteins perform in non-H
'"/>

Contact: Deane Morrison
morri029@umn.edu
612-624-2346
University of Minnesota
24-Jun-2004


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. New molecular link key to cellular proteins involved in cancer progression, other diseases
2. Researchers identify protein promoting vascular tumor growth
3. UCI scientists successfully target key HIV protein; breakthrough may lead to new drug therapies
4. Experimental drug shown to block mutant protein causing blood disease
5. Loss of the neuronal adhesion protein d-catenin leads to severe cognitive dysfunction
6. Images of tail of protein needed for cell multiplication suggest anticancer drug targets
7. New dye directly reveals activated proteins in living cells
8. Disruption of protein-folding causes neurodegeneration, mental retardation
9. A new protein is discovered to play a key role in cancer progression
10. Optimizing proteins death domain halts leukemia in laboratory study
11. Stuck on you: Scientists lay bare secrets of bacterial attachment proteins

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/22/2016)... , June 22, 2016  The American College of ... Trade Show Executive Magazine as one of the fastest-growing ... May 25-27 at the Bellagio in Las Vegas ... the highest percentage of growth in each of the following ... exhibiting companies and number of attendees. The 2015 ACMG Annual ...
(Date:6/22/2016)... On Monday, the Department of Homeland Security ... solutions for the Biometric Exit Program. The Request for ... (CBP), explains that CBP intends to add biometrics to ... United States , in order to deter visa ... Logo - http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20160622/382209LOGO ...
(Date:6/20/2016)... , June 20, 2016 Securus ... justice technology solutions for public safety, investigation, corrections ... the prisons involved, it has secured the final ... (DOC) facilities for Managed Access Systems (MAS) installed. ... additional facilities to be installed by October, 2016. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/30/2016)...  Tempus, a technology company focused on supporting ... Cancer Center have partnered to better determine which ... treatment based on next generation genomic and transcriptomic ... research collaboration, Tempus will provide sequencing and analysis ... to Penn. Utilizing next-generation sequencing, machine learning and ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... , November 30, 2016 Part ... ... Aptuit, LLC today announced that it ... An additional 150,000 novel compounds have increased the Screening Collection ... broaden the hit discovery capabilities of the company. This expansion, ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... ... November 30, 2016 , ... ... technology applications, introduces the 5th generation, ultra-bright, Laser-Driven Light Source, the EQ-77, at ... Source (LDLS™) technology, the EQ-77 offers higher radiance and irradiance from a truly ...
(Date:11/30/2016)... ... 30, 2016 , ... With growth rates averaging more than 30% each year, ... forward to continuing their expansion in their new office space. The new office has ... favoured by the creative industries, so Random42 Scientific Communication will fit right in. ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: