HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Siberian tiger rescued from poacher's snare

(MARCH 9, 2004) Scientists from the Bronx Zoo-based Wildlife Conservation Society and other groups working in the Russian Far East released a Siberian tiger last week, after rescuing it from a snare set out by poachers.

The eight-to-10-year-old male tiger, estimated to weigh almost 400 pounds, was discovered by two Russian students hiking in the woods after they heard it roaring in distress. After they found the snare wrapped around the tiger's body, they quickly notified forest guards staying in a cabin a few miles away.

A team of experts from WCS, Inspection Tiger from Russia's Ministry of Natural Resources, and the Tiger Response Team, arrived on the scene and anesthetized the tiger so it could be removed from the snare.

The tiger had numerous abrasions from the snare, but overall appeared healthy. As a precaution, the team moved the animal to a holding area where it could be observed to make sure it had no internal injuries. Officials believe poachers set the snare specifically to catch tigers, which would have been killed and sold for its skin and body parts. Of the estimated 400 remaining Siberian tigers living in the wild, most are killed by people, according to WCS.

After the tiger was given a clean bill of health, it was fitted with a radio collar, where it will be tracked by WCS scientists as part of a long-term study to better understand and ultimately protect these magnificent big cats.

"The release went well," said WCS scientist John Goodrich, who participated in the animal's rescue and release. "The tiger leapt from his cage about a minute after the door was opened. He then bounded about 20 meters into the forest, stopped, turned, and growled, before walking calmly away."

WCS's conservation efforts to save tigers in the Russian Far East and throughout their range are featured in "Tiger Mountain," a new exhibit that opened at the Bronx Zoo last May.


'"/>

Contact: Stephen Sautner
ssautner@wcs.org
718-220-3682
Wildlife Conservation Society
9-Mar-2004


Page: 1

Related biology news :

1. First-ever photo of wild Siberian tiger taken in China
2. China to declare new reserve for Siberian tigers
3. Could Minnesota forestry save the Siberian tiger?
4. Tracking A Legacy Of Waste In The West Siberian Basin
5. Veterinarians discover first known case of canine distemper in a wild tiger
6. Tiny collars fitted on youngest-ever tiger cubs
7. Laos camera traps capture tigers
8. Worlds largest tiger reserve declared in Myanmar
9. Dodging elephants, scorpions, mudslidesUF researcher tracks tigers
10. Farming the tigers of the sea undermines the promise of aquaculture
11. 19th century museum specimens help plan reintroduction of endangered tiger beetle

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Siberian tiger rescued from poacher snare

(Date:4/17/2014)... . Our eyes ... us with a continuous stream of information about our own ... in a car the world glides by us and ... effort, our brain calculates self-motion from this "optic flow". This ... gaze during our own movements. Together with biologists from the ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... years ago, Katia Silvera , a postdoctoral scholar at ... a field trip in a mountainous area in central Panama ... before. , Unable to identify it, they contacted German Carnevali, ... to be an unnamed species. So Carnevali recently named it ... the genus name, comprising about 40 species in the world. ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... in Europe, Asia and the United States are spreading ... impacting native honeybee populations at this time, according to ... including Nosema microsporidia and Varroa ... to these invasive pests, which suggests to us that ... and the United States currently are not necessary in ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):How vision makes sure that little fish do not get carried away 2How vision makes sure that little fish do not get carried away 3How vision makes sure that little fish do not get carried away 4Orchid named after UC Riverside researcher 2Orchid named after UC Riverside researcher 3East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests… for now 2East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests… for now 3
(Date:1/15/2014)... NY (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 The Microcompetition ... a major disease. One of these latent viruses is the ... rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory ... theory, a study found that RA patients have high concentrations ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 Freeslate, ... solutions, today announced that Lupin Limited, one of India’s ... CM Protégé PharmD System for high throughput ... India, is focused on a wide range of quality, ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 14, 2014 Date: Friday, April 11, 2014 ... Country Club, 1360 Almshouse Road, Warrington, Pa. , ... solely dedicated to finding a cure for hepatitis B and ... host its annual Crystal Ball on Friday, April 11 at ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... a leading provider of strategic communications services to corporations and organizations ... the United States and Europe ... is returning to the firm,s Washington, D.C. ... than two years of service as Associate Commissioner for the Office ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 3Lupin Selects Freeslate’s CM Protégé PharmD System to Accelerate Polymorph Screening for Drug Development 2Lupin Selects Freeslate’s CM Protégé PharmD System to Accelerate Polymorph Screening for Drug Development 3Hepatitis B Foundation to Host Annual Crystal Ball Gala 2Former FDA Associate Commissioner Returns To 3D Communications 2
Cached News: