HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Small, slow growing urchin variety could affect commercial harvest

ORONO, Maine -- The discovery of a type of slow growing sea urchin that never attains legal size for harvesting in Maines coastal waters has been reported by a team of scientists led by Robert Vadas, marine biologist at the University of Maine. If the finding is supported by further research, it suggests that harvesting legal size urchins could cause a shift in the urchin population toward a non-harvestable stock.

The report was published in the scientific journal Ecological Monographs in February. Vadas is a professor in the UMaine Department of Biological Sciences and School of Marine Sciences. Co-authors include Barry D. Smith of the Canadian Wildlife Service, Brian Beal of the University of Maine at Machias and Tim Dowling, a former UMaine graduate student now of Tenants Harbor. The Island Institute of Rockland assisted by providing ship time.

Worldwide, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization reports that fishermen harvested about 262 million pounds of urchins in 1999.

In Maine, the urchin harvest is down considerably from its 1993 peak but still brings in significant revenue. In 2000, harvesters landed about 12 million pounds of urchins worth more than $17 million. The 1993 record of 41 million pounds was worth about $26 million, according to the Maine Department of Marine Resources. Vadas and his colleagues began planning the research in the mid-1990s. "Our original idea was to use a new technique that I had brought back from Norway for determining the age of sea urchins," says Vadas. "We wanted to understand basic aspects of urchin biology, such as their life expectancy, how fast they grow and when they reach reproductive age. Finding two separate groups within the population was a real surprise to us."

The scientists collected urchins from carefully selected spots in two locations along the Maine coast, the Schoodic Peninsula just east of Ellsworth and Allen Island southwest of Port Clyde. After tallying
'"/>

Contact: Robert Vadas
vadas@maine.edu
207-581-2974
University of Maine
28-Mar-2002


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Small, Smac-like molecule encourages death of cancer cells
2. Small, cold, & hungry: Ultra-small microbes from 120,000-year-old glacier ice sample
3. Small, mountain rivers play big role in ocean sediment
4. Symposium examines the growing influence of aerosols on climate
5. Report details growing climate change threat to coral reefs
6. Eastern Europe urged to prepare now for growing threat of HIV resistance
7. Nerac again named one of Connecticuts fastest growing technology companies
8. UMHS researchers find clues to growing new jawbones in cancer patients after radiation therapy
9. New findings in yeast may reveal why growing older is the greatest carcinogen in humans
10. Long-term natural gas supplies should meet growing demand in coming decades, study finds
11. Carnegie Mellon develops new process for growing bone

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Small slow growing urchin variety could affect commercial harvest

(Date:10/31/2014)... 30, 2014  HITLAB SM , a healthcare ... its inaugural HITLAB Innovators Summit SM on ... HITLAB will partner with the Clinton Foundation,s Health ... ProtoHack, Columbia Business School Alumni Club of ... Engineering and Operations Research, bringing together leaders in ...
(Date:10/30/2014)... most animals begin life, cells immediately begin accepting assignments ... However, mammals, including humans, are special. The cells of ... – to become the protective placenta or to commit ... first step that research from Michigan State University has ... issue of PLOS Genetics , provide ...
(Date:10/30/2014)... Philadelphia, PA, October 30, 2014 – Bacteria in ... are critical for digestion. Yet, these same bacteria ... system if they penetrate the gut and enter ... natural response to protect the body, chronic or ... diseases. Prior research has established the involvement of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):HITLAB Announces Inaugural HITLAB Innovators Summit 2HITLAB Announces Inaugural HITLAB Innovators Summit 3Identifying the source of stem cells 2Breakdown in gut barriers to bacteria may promote inflammation and craving in alcoholics 2
(Date:10/31/2014)... October 31, 2014 Having access to ... an uphill battle in many corners of the globe. ... farming community in northwestern Bolivia where many have been ... group from Fairfield University’s School of Engineering has been ... Academica Campesina (UAC), “the united college for the peasants.” ...
(Date:10/31/2014)... Caustic soda is utilized in the production of ... China takes lead in the global caustic soda market, followed ... of facilities in the USA, Germany, Brazil and Canada, is ... in terms of output and production capacities. , The global ... 3% per year in the years ahead. The APAC region ...
(Date:10/31/2014)... The evening of October 29th, Northwestern ... successful medical device development to give its graduate ... to successfully innovate in the complex and highly ... on-site class, Insight gave master’s program students from ... of Engineering, medical and law schools an introductory ...
(Date:10/31/2014)... 2014 Two separate delegations of ... by Charm Sciences at its Andover, Massachusetts facility ... the US, the participants discussed international systems for ... and process verification, and received hands-on technical training ... the first visit to the United States for ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Fairfield University School of Engineering project reduces illness in rural community 2Fairfield University School of Engineering project reduces illness in rural community 3China to Dominate Caustic Soda Market Through 2018, Says Merchant Research & Consulting in Its New Study 2Insight Product Development Gives Northwestern University Students Foundation for Innovation Success 2Insight Product Development Gives Northwestern University Students Foundation for Innovation Success 3Charm Sciences Hosts Executives from Latin America for Dairy Safety Executive Seminar 2
Cached News: