HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Small subset of cells has big role in controlling immunity, study finds

A small subset of cells that tells the immune system whether to attack may be a future target for therapies to help patients fight tumors and keep transplanted organs, a Medical College of Georgia researcher says.

Dendritic cells roam the body, picking up invaders, such as a virus or cancer, then show their finds to the T-cells and tell them how to respond, says Dr. Andrew L. Mellor, molecular geneticist and immunologist and director of the MCG Immunotherapy Center.

Work published in the Aug. 15 issue of The Journal of Immunology by Dr. Mellor and his colleagues gives further clues over what direction dendritic cells will give.

They have shown that giving mice an experimental immunosuppressive agent causes a select number of these cells to express an enzyme, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, or IDO, and that those cells tell T-cells not to respond.

"They are a very fascinating new subset of dendritic cells previously not recognized," says Dr. Mellor, Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Molecular Immunogenetics. "We do not think all dendritic cells have the capacity to express IDO. The magic of this subset is their ability to do that," he said of the enzyme first identified for its role in helping a fetus escape rejection by the mother's immune system.

"One of the things we argue in this paper is that we can use IDO to help us find out if dendritic cells are going to stimulate the immune system or turn it off. If they express IDO, they will not stimulate T cells to respond. If they don't express IDO, they are likely to stimulate immune responses once they mature," Dr. Mellor says.

Five years ago nearly to the day, Dr. Mellor and his colleagues, Drs. David Munn and Simon Conway, were reporting in the journal Science that the developing fetus uses IDO to locally disable the mother's immune system. It works by degrading tryptophan, an amino acid critical to the survival of T-cells, which get their action cues from d
'"/>

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@mail.mcg.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia
15-Aug-2003


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Small, Smac-like molecule encourages death of cancer cells
2. Small animal imaging gives cancer clues
3. Small RNA surmounts large cancer problem
4. Small, cold, & hungry: Ultra-small microbes from 120,000-year-old glacier ice sample
5. Small trial shows daclizumab add-on therapy improves MS outcome
6. Small gene changes in some leukemia patients may explain varying responses to chemotherapy
7. Small amounts of alcohol or anesthetics may damage the developing brain
8. Smallpox in 50-year-old tissues detected by integrated diagnostics approach
9. Small-molecule inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor identified
10. Smallpox in Europe selected for genetic mutation that confers resistance to HIV infection
11. Small-molecule inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin identified

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Small subset cells has big role controlling immunity study finds

(Date:4/17/2014)... trials to treat tuberculosis could be the basis for ... bacteria, fungal infections and parasites, yet evade resistance, according ... collaborators. , Led by U. of I. chemistry professor ... drug SQ109 attacks the tuberculosis bacterium, how the drug ... to malaria and how targeting multiple pathways reduces ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... word for chili peppers. Information about archaeological remains of ... of the appearance of words for chili peppers in ... domesticated and highlight the value of multi-proxy data analysis. ... of nine papers presented in a special feature issue ... Sciences on plant and animal domestication edited by ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... West Orange, NJ. April 16, 2014. Kessler Foundation ... for $1.8 million from the Department of Defense ... PhD, is principal investigator for the randomized, double-blinded, ... to improve bone and muscle strength after spinal ... Human Performance & Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation. ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Multitarget TB drug could treat other diseases, evade resistance 2Chickens to chili peppers 2Chickens to chili peppers 3Kessler Foundation awarded Department of Defense grant for spinal cord injury research 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... , Jan. 15, 2014 TaiGen Biotechnology Company, ... exclusive agreement with R-Pharm, a leading Russian pharmaceutical company, ... the Russian Federation , ... Independent States (CIS). Nemonoxacin is a novel antibiotic for the ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 2014 Histogen, Inc., a regenerative medicine ... grown under simulated embryonic conditions, today announced that they ... Medical, Inc. for physician-dispensed aesthetic products containing Histogen’s proprietary ... agreement is an amendment to the existing license between ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... York, NY (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 ... of Alliqua, Inc. (OTCQB: ALQA). Alliqua is an emerging ... to serve the wound care market. , Free report ... was restructured with a seasoned management team and Board, ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 iLab Solutions, the ... as the new Director of Product Strategy. In this role, ... as iLab sub-teams to guide in the development of iLab ... provides the maximum possible benefit to the scientific community by ...
Breaking Biology Technology:TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 2TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 3TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 4Histogen and Suneva Medical Expand License for Cell Conditioned Media-based Aesthetic Products Internationally 2Histogen and Suneva Medical Expand License for Cell Conditioned Media-based Aesthetic Products Internationally 3EquitiesIQ Initiates Coverage of Alliqua, Inc. 2EquitiesIQ Initiates Coverage of Alliqua, Inc. 3iLab Solutions Announces Michelle Detwiler as the New Director of Product Strategy 2
Cached News: