HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Small subset of cells has big role in controlling immunity, study finds

A small subset of cells that tells the immune system whether to attack may be a future target for therapies to help patients fight tumors and keep transplanted organs, a Medical College of Georgia researcher says.

Dendritic cells roam the body, picking up invaders, such as a virus or cancer, then show their finds to the T-cells and tell them how to respond, says Dr. Andrew L. Mellor, molecular geneticist and immunologist and director of the MCG Immunotherapy Center.

Work published in the Aug. 15 issue of The Journal of Immunology by Dr. Mellor and his colleagues gives further clues over what direction dendritic cells will give.

They have shown that giving mice an experimental immunosuppressive agent causes a select number of these cells to express an enzyme, indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase, or IDO, and that those cells tell T-cells not to respond.

"They are a very fascinating new subset of dendritic cells previously not recognized," says Dr. Mellor, Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Molecular Immunogenetics. "We do not think all dendritic cells have the capacity to express IDO. The magic of this subset is their ability to do that," he said of the enzyme first identified for its role in helping a fetus escape rejection by the mother's immune system.

"One of the things we argue in this paper is that we can use IDO to help us find out if dendritic cells are going to stimulate the immune system or turn it off. If they express IDO, they will not stimulate T cells to respond. If they don't express IDO, they are likely to stimulate immune responses once they mature," Dr. Mellor says.

Five years ago nearly to the day, Dr. Mellor and his colleagues, Drs. David Munn and Simon Conway, were reporting in the journal Science that the developing fetus uses IDO to locally disable the mother's immune system. It works by degrading tryptophan, an amino acid critical to the survival of T-cells, which get their action cues from d
'"/>

Contact: Toni Baker
tbaker@mail.mcg.edu
706-721-4421
Medical College of Georgia
15-Aug-2003


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Small, Smac-like molecule encourages death of cancer cells
2. Small animal imaging gives cancer clues
3. Small RNA surmounts large cancer problem
4. Small, cold, & hungry: Ultra-small microbes from 120,000-year-old glacier ice sample
5. Small trial shows daclizumab add-on therapy improves MS outcome
6. Small gene changes in some leukemia patients may explain varying responses to chemotherapy
7. Small amounts of alcohol or anesthetics may damage the developing brain
8. Smallpox in 50-year-old tissues detected by integrated diagnostics approach
9. Small-molecule inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor identified
10. Smallpox in Europe selected for genetic mutation that confers resistance to HIV infection
11. Small-molecule inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin identified

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Small subset cells has big role controlling immunity study finds

(Date:7/29/2014)... latest research from the University of Adelaide ... of many preterm children can perform almost as well as ... University,s Robinson Research Institute has found that as ... early life, their cognitive abilities as a teenager can potentially ... results of the study, published in this month,s issue of ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for other purposes ... inside human cells, including those that cause Legionnaires, disease, ... mBio , the online open-access journal of the ... identifying non-antibiotic drugs that could one day help curb ... the list inhibit the growth of at least three ...
(Date:7/28/2014)... and organic compounds in hydrothermal environments are critical components ... for the deep biosphere, and may have implications for ... about how minerals influence organic reactions. A team ... a common mineral acts as a catalysts for specific ... solvents or expensive reagents. , At the heart of ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Preterm children's brains can catch up years later 2New route to identify drugs that can fight bacterial infections 2Mineral magic? Common mineral capable of making and breaking bonds 2Mineral magic? Common mineral capable of making and breaking bonds 3
(Date:7/29/2014)... HOUSTON (July 29, 2014) Tough, ultralight foam ... and shape through a chemical process invented at Rice ... "GO-0.5BN" looks like a nanoscale building, with floors and ... a pair of two-dimensional materials: floors and walls of ... boron nitride platelets. , The researchers say the ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... DALLAS , July 29, 2014 ... Market Slide Scanners (Whole Slide Imaging), Analytics (Image Analysis Software), ... Storage - Global Forecasts & Trends to 2018", published ... and restraints in geographies such as North ... Asia , and the Rest of the ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... HILLS, Calif. , July 29, 2014 /PRNewswire/ ... specializing in personalized medicine, treatment of infectious diseases ... strategies of prognosis and prevention of pathologies like ... of August 1, 2014, ImmunoClin Corporation will complete ... Washington, D.C. , a key ...
(Date:7/29/2014)... 2014  Sigma-Aldrich Corporation (NASDAQ: SIAL ) ... its investment in Green Chemistry and donated more than ... year, the Company announced Monday in its new ... World? The report comes in a ... a responsible corporate citizen, including recognition for the second ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Tough foam from tiny sheets 2Digital Pathology Market worth $437 Million by 2018 2Digital Pathology Market worth $437 Million by 2018 3ImmunoClin Corporation (IMCL) Relocates Corporate Headquarters to Washington, DC 2ImmunoClin Corporation (IMCL) Relocates Corporate Headquarters to Washington, DC 3Sigma-Aldrich Achieves Record Success in Environmental, Community Initiatives 2Sigma-Aldrich Achieves Record Success in Environmental, Community Initiatives 3
Cached News: