HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Smaller households fuel global housing boom and threaten biodiversity, study finds

A new study in the journal Nature concludes that the average household is shrinking - a worldwide trend that is fueling an international housing boom, which threatens the survival of plants and animals in dozens of countries including the United States.

According to the study, housing units throughout the world are being built at a rate that outpaces population growth, resulting in a loss of habitat, natural resources and biodiversity.

''We had hoped to find that, where human population growth was slowing, biodiversity might be given some breathing room,'' said Stanford University ecologist Gretchen C. Daily, co-author of the study. ''But instead, we've found that urban and suburban sprawl are accelerating faster than population growth is decelerating.''

A research scientist with Stanford's Center for Conservation Biology, Daily also is an associate professor (research) in biological sciences and a senior fellow with the university's Institute for International Studies.

''To our knowledge, this is the first study to look at the environmental impact of households on a global scale,'' Daily added.

Writing in the Jan. 12 edition of Nature online, she and her colleagues noted that the housing boom is largely being driven by a global trend toward smaller households. Throughout the world, the average number of people living together in a household is shrinking - primarily because of lower fertility rates, higher divorce rates, higher per capita income, aging populations and a decline in multi-generational family units, the authors noted.

''Reduction in average household size takes a double toll on resource use and biodiversity,'' they wrote. ''First, more households means more housing units, thus generally increasing the amount of land and materials (for example, wood, concrete and steel) needed for housing construction.''

Second, fewer people per household leads to higher per-capita consumption of water, fuel, land
'"/>

Contact: Mark Shwartz
mshwartz@stanford.edu
650-723-9296
Stanford University
12-Jan-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Smaller food portions may explain the French paradox of rich foods and a svelte population
2. Few microbiological differences in households using antibacterials
3. Researchers tie worldwide biodiversity threats to growth in households
4. Poplar DNA code cracked -- a step in combating global warming?
5. Do genes respond to global warming?
6. Fossils reveal direct link between global warming and genetic diversity in wildlife
7. Technology already exists to stabilize global warming
8. NASA scientists get global fix on food, wood & fiber use
9. New version of premier global climate model released
10. Trapping carbon in soil key for protecting global food security, dealing with climate change
11. First ever standards linking climate change, biodiversity and poverty seek global peer review

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:1/4/2017)... the thousands of attendees at this year,s International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), ... measurement devices and services, will be featuring its new line of ULTRA ... special CES Exhibit Suite , the new upper arm and wrist ... WellnessConnected product platform.  Continue Reading ... ...
(Date:12/22/2016)... YORK , December 22, 2016 ... provider of secure solutions for the e-Government, Public Safety, HealthCare, and ... subsidiary of SuperCom, has been selected to implement and deploy a ... in Northern California , further expanding its presence ... ...
(Date:12/16/2016)...   IdentyTechSolutions America LLC , a leading ... and a cutting-edge manufacturer of software and hardware ... seamless, integrated solutions that comprise IDT biometric readers ... provide IdentyTech,s customers with combined physical identification and ... and theft. "We are proud to ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:1/14/2017)... , Jan. 13, 2017  The Alliance for ... in response to FDA final guidance on ... its continued leadership in emphasizing the importance of distinct ... keenly aware of the benefits biosimilars will bring to ... Yet the portion of the Guidance dealing ...
(Date:1/13/2017)... Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global ... ... CAGR of 16.83% during the period 2017-2021. The report ... market for 2017-2021. To calculate the market size, the report considers the ... also includes a a discussion of the key vendors operating in this ...
(Date:1/13/2017)... ... January 13, 2017 , ... FireflySci has been ... found among its diverse customer base. The latest entry in this field is ... including BTX and Bio-Rad. FireflySci is introducing three distinct varieties including a 10x1mm, ...
(Date:1/12/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... January 12, ... ... USING VTI’S INTERFUSE® IS A SUCCESS , VTI, Vertebral Technologies, Inc., announces ... the InterFuse® laterally expandable device. Since September 2016, VTI (Vertebral Technologies, Inc.) ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: