HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Some 400 'fragile regions' of genome more vulnerable to evolutionary breaks

San Diego, June 16, 2003 -- Researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering have uncovered evidence that major evolutionary changes are more likely to occur in approximately 400 'fragile' genomic regions that account for only 5 percent of the human genome. The findings, reported in the June 24 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), undercut the widely held view among scientists that evolutionary breakpoints -- disruptions in the order of genes on chromosomes -- are purely random. Apart from its implications for evolutionary theory, the study could have major implications for medical research related to diseases such as leukemia, which are caused by clinical (rather than evolutionary) chromosomal breakpoints.

"These rearrangements are like earthquakes that are more likely to happen along fault lines, which is why you're more likely to see a quake in Los Angeles than Chicago," said Pavel Pevzner, the Ronald R. Taylor Chair in the Jacobs School's Computer Science and Engineering department, who co-authored the study with project scientist Glenn Tesler. "Similarly, there are 'faults' within the human genome. They are fragile regions, as opposed to solid regions that show much less propensity for rearrangement and make up about 95 percent of the genome."

Pevzner and Tesler are experts in bioinformatics -- the use of computing and mathematics to study genomes -- and their study grew out of the first giant genomic sequencing projects, funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. Those projects resulted in DNA sequencing of the human and mouse genomes. In December 2002, that comparison led the scientists to compute 281 large blocks (of one million 'letters' or more, out of roughly three billion letters in the mammalian genome), and 245 major rearrangements since the two species evolved from a common ancestor 75 million years ago. "Like the ancient super-continent Pangea broke
'"/>

Contact: Doug Ramsey
dramsey@ucsd.edu
858-822-5825
University of California - San Diego
16-Jun-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Scientists sequence genome of kind of organism central to biospheres carbon cycle
2. Keep genome data freely accessible
3. The book opens on the first tree genome
4. NSF awards 22 new projects for plant genome research
5. Milk genome symposium
6. Environmental decontamination, greenhouse gases, and the genome of a methane-loving bacterium
7. Scientists explore genome of methane-breathing microbe
8. National Academies advisory: genome data and bioterrorism
9. Adaptive changes in the genome may provide insight into the genetics of complex disease
10. Complex cells likely arose from combination of bacterial and extreme-microbe genomes
11. Researchers identify the genomes controlling elements

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/22/2014)... disease causing agents, some viruses can perform crucial ... the world we live in today, according to ... Microbiology. , "Viruses participate in essential Earth processes ... from contributing to biogeochemical cycles, shaping the atmospheric ... Roossinck of Pennsylvania State University, a member of ...
(Date:7/22/2014)... some point, most kids will hear that drinking milk helps make ... But do these messages foster the idea that if something is ... new study in the Journal of Consumer Research , when ... to eat it. , "We predicted that when food is presented ... achieve a goal such as learning how to read or count, ...
(Date:7/22/2014)... Buccola, MSN, APRN, PMHCNS-BC, CNE, Assistant Professor of ... Orleans School of Nursing, contributed samples used in ... associated with schizophrenia and also suggesting a possible ... study, Biological insights from 108 schizophrenia-associated genetic loci, ... Nature , available at http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature13595.html., ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Report on viruses looks beyond disease 2LSUHSC contributes to work identifying new DNA regions associated with schizophrenia 2
(Date:7/22/2014)... Even within a phylum so full of mean little ... arthropods for its cruelty -- at least to crickets. Native ... is a most predatory sort of parasite. It swoops onto ... of larvae, and leaves its wicked brood to invade, kill ... of this would be possible without the fly,s ability to ...
(Date:7/22/2014)... rod-shaped metal nanoparticles in water with ultrasound and they,ll ... Why? No one yet knows exactly. But researchers at ... clocked their speedand it,s fast. At up to 150,000 ... than any nanoscale object submerged in liquid ever reported. ... up the possibility that they could be used not ...
(Date:7/22/2014)... , July 22, 2014   BioTE ... therapy using natural, bio-identical hormone pellets, today announced ... MD to the company.   Dr. Rouzier is joining ... physician.      Dr. Rouzier was residency ... UCLA and is a board certified emergency physician ...
(Date:7/22/2014)... July 22, 2014 CTD Holdings, Inc. ... pharmaceutical, medical device, cosmetics, and other markets, announced today ... a group of qualified private investors led by Novit ... , The transaction involved the signing of a ... shares of Common Stock at a price per share ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Fly-inspired sound detector 2Fly-inspired sound detector 3Fly-inspired sound detector 4NIST shows ultrasonically propelled nanorods spin dizzyingly fast 2Dr. Neal Rouzier Joins BioTE Medical 2Dr. Neal Rouzier Joins BioTE Medical 3CTD Holdings Closes $1.725 Million Private Placement 2CTD Holdings Closes $1.725 Million Private Placement 3
Cached News: