HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Stanford researchers isolate protein needed for stem cell maintenance

STANFORD, Calif. - Scientists have finally laid hands on the first member of a recalcitrant group of proteins called the Wnts two decades after their discovery. Important regulators of animal development, these proteins were suspected to have a role in keeping stem cells in their youthful, undifferentiated state - a suspicion that has proven correct, according to research carried out in two laboratories at Stanford University Medical Center. The ability to isolate Wnt proteins could help researchers grow some types of stem cells for use in bone marrow transplants or other therapies.

The gene coding for a protein usually reveals clues about how that protein will react in the lab and how best to isolate it from other molecules. The Wnts are unusual, however, because the way they behave in the lab differs from what the gene suggests. Roeland Nusse, PhD, professor of developmental biology at the School of Medicine and one of the first to isolate a Wnt (pronounced "wint") gene, reports how his lab members overcame these hurdles in the April 27 advance online edition of the journal Nature.

"We found that the protein is modified, explaining why it has been difficult to isolate," said Nusse, who is also an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Although the protein's structure suggests it should dissolve easily in water, Karl Willert, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in Nusse's lab, found that an attached fat molecule makes the protein shun water and prefer the company of detergents instead.

With a Wnt in hand, researchers could finally confirm previous hints that the protein helps stem cells maintain their youthful state. This work, led by Irving Weissman, MD, the Karel and Avice Beekhuis Professor of Cancer Biology, involved cells in the bone marrow called hematopoietic stem cells that generate all blood cells throughout a person's life. When these cells divide, some offspring go on to become red blood cells, immune cells and other blood compo
'"/>

Contact: Amy Adams
amyadams@stanford.edu
650-723-3900
Stanford University Medical Center
27-Apr-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Tiny molecules have big potential as cancer drugs, Stanford researcher believes
2. Stanford researchers findings may shed light on common, deadly birth defect
3. Leukemia stem cells identified by Stanford researchers
4. New view of leukemia cells identifies best treatment options, Stanford researchers say
5. Confidentiality of genetic databases questioned by Stanford researchers
6. Stanford researchers go from heaven to Earth in lifeguard test
7. Transplant rejection averted by simple light exposure in Stanford animal study
8. Fat cells heal skull defects in mice, Stanford research shows
9. Gene-based screen sorts cancer cases, say Stanford researchers
10. Elusive but ubiquitous microbe fingered as gum disease culprit in Stanford study
11. Sticklebacks reveal secrets to evolutionary change in Stanford study

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:10/3/2019)... ... October 02, 2019 , ... Connecticut Innovations (CI), Connecticut’s strategic ... Connecticut’s innovative, growing companies, today announced that it has closed on a $750,000 ... of the 2018 VentureClash competition. , The outlay is part ...
(Date:9/30/2019)... , ... September 30, 2019 , ... ... focused on increasing the capacity of life science organizations to accelerate innovation and ... Francisco, CA on October 4th. , What: Just 30 days to 21 CFR ...
(Date:9/30/2019)... FREDERICK, Md. (PRWEB) , ... ... ... a biotechnology market disrupter and leading supplier of innovative human mesenchymal stem/stromal ... Australia for novel product formulations related to “Ready-to-Print” (RTP) cellular product formats ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/10/2019)... ... 2019 , ... R3 Stem Cell announces it has added an exosome presentation ... Las Vegas with spots still open. , The speaker, Dr. Ian White PhD, is ... including Cornell, Harvard and Dartmouth. He currently serves as the Chief Scientific Officer at ...
(Date:10/3/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... October 01, 2019 , ... ... brain relax and reset itself, announced the midway point of its randomized research ... of the study is to measure the efficacy of a non-invasive technology which ...
(Date:10/3/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... October 02, 2019 , ... ... using mass spectrometry, is pleased to announce that it has moved into a ... among other analytical instruments, the new facility demonstrates the company's continuous commitment to ...
(Date:9/24/2019)... ... September 24, 2019 , ... ... development, and manufacturing solutions for drugs, biologics, gene therapies, and consumer health ... on the development of therapies to treat central nervous system (CNS) disorders, ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: