HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Stem cell study provides new clues to origin of Down syndrome

MADISON - Using stem cells as a window to the earliest developmental processes in the human brain, scientists have found that a group of genes critical for brain development is selectively disrupted in Down syndrome.

Writing in the recent issue (Jan. 26, 2002) of the British medical journal The Lancet, a team of scientists from the University of Cambridge, University College London and the University of Wisconsin-Madison report findings from a genetic study based on stem cells derived from Down syndrome and normal fetal tissue.

The results illuminate some of the key cellular and molecular processes that give rise to Down syndrome, one of the most common causes of developmental disability in humans. The study is the first of its kind using human cells.

The central finding of the study, according to Clive N. Svendsen, a UW-Madison professor of anatomy and neurology and a co-author of the report, is that a faulty genetic circuit results in dramatic changes in the development of the cells that make up the early brain.

"These findings point to a serious deficit in specific genes known to be important for neuronal development," said Svendsen who is currently director of the stem cell research program at the UW-Madison Waisman Center, one of the world's leading centers for the study of human development, developmental disabilities, and neurodegenerative diseases.

The Lancet study, which Svendsen co-authored with lead author Sabine Bahn, University of Cambridge, and others has begun to shed light on the earliest genetic events in humans that give rise to a serious cognitive disability.

It has long been known that most instances of Down syndrome, which affects nearly 350,000 people in the United States alone, results from an extra chromosome, chromosome 21, in the cells of those who have the condition. However, the precise genetic events that lead to the abnormal brain development of people with Down syndrome have not been u
'"/>

Contact: Clive N. Svendsen
svendsen@waisman.wisc.edu
608-265-8668
University of Wisconsin-Madison
30-Jan-2002


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Student science contest participation influences study, career choices, alumni say
2. New study shows hope for treating inhalant abuse
3. International study findings link acne-like rash to effectiveness of new targeted cancer treatment
4. Cigarette smoke causes breaks in DNA and defects to a cells chromosomes, Pitt study finds
5. New study indicates arsenic could be suitable as first-line treatment in type of leukaemia
6. Phase II trials of second-generation antisense cancer drug planned following successful early study
7. Preclinical safety study shows adipose-derived stem cells improve heart function after heart attack
8. Indiana University, EPA to study airborne PCBs
9. K-State, other universities to study how climate affects plant evolution
10. USC study links historical increases in life span to lower childhood exposure to infection
11. Washington University in St. Louis leads group studying aging process

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:7/11/2019)... ... July 11, 2019 , ... ... first on-site Legionella DNA test, today announced a partnership with LiquiTech, a ... , Through this strategic partnership, LiquiTech will integrate Spartan’s innovative environmental DNA ...
(Date:7/5/2019)... VIEW, Calif. (PRWEB) , ... July 05, 2019 ... ... partnering with Microsoft to bring its patented Tractus™ Platform to governments around the ... will bring cutting edge technology and point of care solutions to operating theatres ...
(Date:6/19/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... June 19, 2019 , ... Dahryn Trivedi, ... physicochemical properties of Cefazolin Sodium, antibiotic which can prove to be beneficial for treating ... 519% increase in residue amount , Over 68% decrease in weight ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 10, 2019 , ... Advancements ... an upcoming episode, scheduled to broadcast 4Q/2019. Check your local listings for more ... educate viewers about how its technology facilitates laboratories to improve efficiency and quality ...
(Date:6/11/2019)... ... June 11, 2019 , ... A study ... stem cells (MSC-EV) are able to incorporate into human CD34+ cells, modifying their ... mice, MSC-EVs also increased the cells’ ability to lodge into bone marrow. This ...
(Date:5/31/2019)... ... May 30, 2019 , ... World ... Integrity on July 08-09, 2019 in Boston, MA. This peer recommended interactive workshop ... organizations. , The training will kick off with a compendial treatment of Data ...
(Date:5/21/2019)... (PRWEB) , ... May 21, 2019 , ... ... in Berlin (VLB) today officially opened the inaugural Africa Brewing Conference dedicated to ... malting industry in Africa. The event, which is supported through a partnership with ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: