HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Study Of Microbes May Hone Predictions Of Mining Impact

By tracing the abundance and distribution of bacteria in an abandoned California mine, scientists may have found a better way to predict the potential environmental consequences of mining metal ores.

Writing this week (March 6) in the journal Science, a team of University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists presents the first in situ, molecular-level ecological study of the naturally occurring microbes that mediate some of the most severe pollution events associated with sulfide mining. The findings could provide the mining industry and others with a new predictive technology, one capable of estimating acid mine drainage from a given site.

Acid mine drainage is the flow of sulfuric acid into ground and surface water from metallic-ore mines. In addition to contributing sulfuric acid to nearby water supplies, the sulfuric acid itself facilitates the release and suspension of heavy metals into water, one of the most vexing consequences of sulfide mining.

In nature, minerals exposed to oxygen and water form sulfuric acid. Around mines, an abundance of minerals is exposed to the surface in tailings and the exposed surfaces of ore bodies, and they oxidize naturally. But contributing to the process are naturally-occurring bacteria which, like tiny factories, greatly accelerate the rate of oxidation. The bacteria are widely considered to be the microorganisms that control the production rate of acid mine drainage.

Knowing precisely where and under what conditions the microbes thrive in nature can be a powerful new tool to predict the effects of sulfide mining at a given site, said Katrina J. Edwards, a UW-Madison graduate student and a co-author of the study.

Prior to the new study, conducted at Iron Mountain, Calif., an abandoned and heavily polluted iron mine, two species of bacteria, Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, were believed to be the primary microbial culprits involved in accelerating acid mine drainage.

But r
'"/>

Contact: Katrina J. Edwards
katrina@geology.wisc.edu
608-262-0915
University of Wisconsin-Madison
5-Mar-1998


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Study: Emission of smog ingredients from trees is increasing rapidly
2. Study explores gene transfer to modify underlying course of Alzheimers disease
3. Study reveals why eyes in some paintings seem to follow viewers
4. Study by Israeli scientists provides insight on DNA code
5. Study reveals first genetic step necessary for prostate cancer growth
6. Study of flu patients reveals virus outsmarting key drug
7. Study in Science reveals recreational fishing takes big bite of ocean catch
8. Study suggests cell-cycle triggers might be cancer drug targets
9. Study narrows search for genes placing men at increased risk for prostate cancer
10. Study links high carbohydrate diet to increased breast cancer risk
11. Study explains spatial orientation differences between sexes

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Study Microbes May Hone Predictions Mining Impact

(Date:4/16/2014)... of the Physical Biosciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley ... is recognized as a leading authority on the ... and their application to systems and synthetic biology, ... the 2013 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award by U.S. ... the Department of Energy (DOE),s highest scientific honor, ...
(Date:4/16/2014)... or to conquer the world? Surprisingly, bacteria also ... in Munich have now shown how these organisms ... , The bacterium Bacillus subtilis is ... on agar surfaces by means of flagella. Alternatively, ... the bacteria proliferate most effectively in this stationary ...
(Date:4/16/2014)... Prechtl, Leo Heim and their colleagues at the University ... method of generating hydrogen using water and formaldehyde. The ... when it comes to fuel cell technologies. The results ... using water and formaldehyde", have recently been published in ... applications, the new approach can be used to recycle ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Berkeley Lab's Adam Arkin wins 2013 Lawrence Award 2Berkeley Lab's Adam Arkin wins 2013 Lawrence Award 3Theoretical biophysics: Adventurous bacteria 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2014 The Microcompetition with Foreign DNA ... disease. One of these latent viruses is the Epstein ... rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic ... by the theory, a study found that RA patients ... (1). , What is Microcompetition? , Dr. Hanan ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... Sunnyvale, CA (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 ... of high throughput research solutions, today announced that ... companies, has received delivery of Freeslate’s CM ... form screening. , Lupin, headquartered in Mumbai, ... quality, affordable generic and branded formulations and Active ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 Date: Friday, ... p.m. , Location: Warrington Country Club, 1360 Almshouse Road, ... Foundation, the only national nonprofit organization solely dedicated to ... quality of life for those affected worldwide, will host ... Warrington Country Club in Warrington, Pa. , Each ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... , Jan. 14, 2014  3D Communications, a leading provider ... major scientific, regulatory, business, and media events in ... , today announced its former associate Virginia Cox , ... office. Virginia Cox re-joins ... Commissioner for the Office of External Affairs at the U.S. ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 3Lupin Selects Freeslate’s CM Protégé PharmD System to Accelerate Polymorph Screening for Drug Development 2Lupin Selects Freeslate’s CM Protégé PharmD System to Accelerate Polymorph Screening for Drug Development 3Hepatitis B Foundation to Host Annual Crystal Ball Gala 2Former FDA Associate Commissioner Returns To 3D Communications 2
Cached News: