HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Study of flu patients reveals virus outsmarting key drug

MADISON - A drug envisioned as a front-line defense for the next flu pandemic might have a genetic Achilles' heel that results in a drug-resistant influenza virus capable of infecting new human hosts, according to a study published this week (Aug. 28) in the British medical journal The Lancet.

The study of Japanese children with influenza and treated with the antiviral drug oseltamivir was conducted by an international team of researchers led by virologist Yoshihiro Kawaoka of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Tokyo. Results of the study showed that nearly 20 percent of patients treated with the drug produced mutant drug-resistant viruses as soon as four days after treatment. Moreover, patients continued to shed significant amounts of infectious viral particles even after five days of treatment with the potent antiviral agent.

"The problem with this compound is that a single (genetic) mutation makes the virus resistant," says Kawaoka, an authority on influenza who holds an appointment at the UW-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine.

The finding is important because it provides evidence that influenza viruses can easily and quickly thwart one of the few lines of defense for a disease that claims many lives each year and that, in a pandemic, is among the world's most feared and deadly diseases.

"The importance of this work is that when a pandemic occurs with a new virus and this drug is extensively used, then we may be faced with the rapid appearance of resistant viruses," Kawaoka says.

At present, there are only two strategies for stemming the spread of influenza: vaccines and antiviral drugs. Vaccines use inactivated forms of a virus to ramp up the immune system and thwart infection. Antiviral drugs such as oseltamivir work by inhibiting key proteins on the surface of the virus, effectively locking them in their host cells and preventing the virus from escaping and infecting new cells and hosts.


'"/>

Contact: Yoshihiro Kawaoka
kawaokay@svm.vetmed.wisc.edu
University of Wisconsin-Madison
26-Aug-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Study: Emission of smog ingredients from trees is increasing rapidly
2. Study explores gene transfer to modify underlying course of Alzheimers disease
3. Study reveals why eyes in some paintings seem to follow viewers
4. Study by Israeli scientists provides insight on DNA code
5. Study reveals first genetic step necessary for prostate cancer growth
6. Study in Science reveals recreational fishing takes big bite of ocean catch
7. Study suggests cell-cycle triggers might be cancer drug targets
8. Study narrows search for genes placing men at increased risk for prostate cancer
9. Study links high carbohydrate diet to increased breast cancer risk
10. Study explains spatial orientation differences between sexes
11. Study suggests humans can speed evolution

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:6/30/2017)... 2017 Today, American Trucking Associations announced ... face and eye tracking software, became the newest ... "Artificial intelligence and advanced sensing ... a driver,s attentiveness levels while on the road.  ... detect fatigue and prevent potential accidents, which could ...
(Date:5/16/2017)... , May 16, 2017  Veratad Technologies, LLC ( ... online age and identity verification solutions, announced today they ... Conference 2017, May 15 thru May 17, 2017, in ... and International Trade Center. Identity impacts ... and in today,s quickly evolving digital world, defining identity ...
(Date:4/19/2017)... York , April 19, 2017 ... as its vendor landscape is marked by the presence ... market is however held by five major players - ... Together these companies accounted for nearly 61% of the ... the leading companies in the global military biometrics market ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... The CRISPR-Cas9 ... enabling overexpression experiments and avoiding the use of exogenous expression plasmids. The simplicity ... for performing systematic gain-of-function studies. , This complement to loss-of-function studies, such ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... 2017 , ... ComplianceOnline’s Medical Device Summit is back for its 4th year. ... San Francisco, CA. The Summit brings together current and former FDA office bearers, regulators, ... government officials from around the world to address key issues in device compliance, quality ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... , Oct. 11, 2017  VMS BioMarketing, a leading provider ... nationwide oncology Clinical Nurse Educator (CNE) network, which will launch ... for communication among health care professionals to enhance the patient ... office staff, and other health care professionals to help women ... cancer. ...
(Date:10/11/2017)... ... October 11, 2017 , ... Disappearing forests and increased ... of over 5.5 million people each year. Especially those living in larger cities are ... - based in one of the most pollution-affected countries globally - decided to take ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: