HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Study pinpoints regulator of imprinted gene expression

(Embargoed) CHAPEL HILL -- New research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill offers an important contribution to a new wave of thinking in genetics: the idea that not all human disease states are due to alterations in DNA sequence.

A growing body of research on these "epigenetic" changes are leading geneticists to rethink the conventional view that all human disease is fundamentally tied to DNA sequence variation (changes in the actual sequence of the DNA nucleic acid code of A's, C's, G's and T's within any given gene).

The DNA within human cells contains the information for roughly 35,000 different proteins that carry out the body's functions. But not all of these genes are active all of the time. Like switches, epigenetic modifications to proteins surrounding the DNA regulate a given gene's activity, such that only those that are required in a particular cell are active (switched on). These changes constitute a "memory" of gene activity that can be passed on each time a cell divides.

If these epigenetic modifications do not occur properly, the result can cause some genes to become switched on or off incorrectly, thereby having profound biological consequences. Incorrect epigenetic modifications have been implicated in many human disorders including several types of cancer, birth defects and mental retardation.

"These expression changes are heritable and are not related to sequence changes in the gene that is directly affected", said Dr. Terry Magnuson, Kenan professor of genetics and director of the Carolina Center for Genome Sciences. "Sequencing the human genome will not necessarily lead one to discover why these genes are expressed abnormally."

For example, there is a recent awareness among scientists of a new type of health threat posed by environmental chemicals that can disrupt endocrine signals during critical periods of development through epigenetic alterations. Additionally, researchers studying
'"/>

Contact: Leslie Lang
llang@med.unc.edu
919-843-9687
University of North Carolina School of Medicine
9-Mar-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Study: Emission of smog ingredients from trees is increasing rapidly
2. Study explores gene transfer to modify underlying course of Alzheimers disease
3. Study reveals why eyes in some paintings seem to follow viewers
4. Study by Israeli scientists provides insight on DNA code
5. Study reveals first genetic step necessary for prostate cancer growth
6. Study of flu patients reveals virus outsmarting key drug
7. Study in Science reveals recreational fishing takes big bite of ocean catch
8. Study suggests cell-cycle triggers might be cancer drug targets
9. Study narrows search for genes placing men at increased risk for prostate cancer
10. Study links high carbohydrate diet to increased breast cancer risk
11. Study explains spatial orientation differences between sexes

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Study pinpoints regulator imprinted gene expression

(Date:4/17/2014)... honored Clemson professor Rajendra Singh Thursday as a ... and expand solar deployment in the residential, commercial ... Banks Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and ... considered a local hero leading the charge across ... in solar power and driving policy changes at ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... the Amazon help create tinderbox conditions for wildfires ... forest loss during drought years, according to a ... in the Amazon could reach a "tipping point" ... to large-scale loss of trees, making recovery more ... Penn State. , "We documented one of the ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... a stark warning on the possible effects of gases ... 32 times that of carbon dioxide. Now a team ... as fully regenerable electron acceptors which helps explain why ... of being released to the atmosphere. However, there are ... enter into a vicious cycle to release large amounts ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):White House honors Clemson professor as 'Champion of Change' for solar deployment 2Drought and fire in the Amazon lead to sharp increases in forest tree mortality 2Drought and fire in the Amazon lead to sharp increases in forest tree mortality 3Methane climate change risk suggested by proof of redox cycling of humic substances 2
(Date:1/14/2014)... MA (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 iLab Solutions, ... Detwiler as the new Director of Product Strategy. In this ... well as iLab sub-teams to guide in the development of ... iLab provides the maximum possible benefit to the scientific community ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 2014  RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation (OTCQX: RXII), a biotechnology ... therapies addressing major unmet medical needs using RNA-targeted ... of Allowance from the United States Patent and ... (sd-rxRNA®), for the treatment of fibrosis. The patent ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 2014   Kinaxis ®, provider of RapidResponse ®, a ... operations planning ( S&OP ) service, is proud to be ... will be held at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront, January ... Elisabeth Kaszas , Director of Supply Chain at Amgen, ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... 14, 2014 Kerr Corporation, a leading manufacturer ... additional how-to information about dual arch impressions on its dental ... Arch Impressions,” the blog entry serves up a list of ... a step-by-step demonstration by Dr. David Little as he crafts ...
Breaking Biology Technology:iLab Solutions Announces Michelle Detwiler as the New Director of Product Strategy 2RXi Pharmaceuticals Receives US Notice of Allowance for a Key Patent Relating to its Self-Delivering Technology with sd-rxRNAs targeting CTGF, including RXI-109, for the Treatment of Fibrotic Disorders 2RXi Pharmaceuticals Receives US Notice of Allowance for a Key Patent Relating to its Self-Delivering Technology with sd-rxRNAs targeting CTGF, including RXI-109, for the Treatment of Fibrotic Disorders 3Event Alert: Kinaxis Customer to Present at the Biomanufacturing Summit "Supply Chain: Improving Network Effectiveness" 2
Cached News: