HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Study shows top predator makes prey population vulnerable in catastrophe

Darwin himself didn't quite state it this way, but it must have crossed his mind that "when the cat's away, the mice will play." Now, biologists at the University of California, Davis, and Washington University in St. Louis have completed a unique study of lizard populations on tiny islands in the Bahamas that shows what happens when a natural catastrophe devastates both the cats and the mice.

On islands devoid of cats, the mice rebound more quickly. Thomas W. Schoener, Ph.D., and David A. Spiller, of the University of California, Davis, and Jonathan B. Losos, Ph.D., professor of biology at Washington University in St. Louis were studying the effects of a large predator lizard species, the curly-tailed lizard, on both its prey, a smaller species called the brown anole, and on the entire food chain on 12 baseball-diamond sized islands in the northern Bahamas. Hurricane Floyd struck the area in the fall of 1999, drastically changing the experiment.

In 1997, just months after introducing the large predatory lizard, Leiocephalus carinatus, to islands on which the smaller lizard, Anolis sagrei, lived, the biologists had been stunned to find that anole populations were just half those on six other islands where the curly-tailed lizard did not exist; this difference presumably was a result of the much larger species eating the smaller one. In late 1999, two months after the hurricane, the researchers found that anole populations on the six islands with the predator were much more greatly reduced from pre-hurricane levels than were no-predator control islands.

One year later, the control populations had all returned to their pre-hurricane numbers, but most of the populations on the predator-present islands had failed to recover and several were extinct.

"The study shows dramatically that the presence of a top predator on an island affects the vulnerability of a prey population to a catastrophic event," says Losos. "The study is rare because it
'"/>

Contact: Susan Killenberg McGinn
susan_killenberg@aismail.wustl.edu
314-935-5254
Washington University in St. Louis
11-Jul-2001


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Study: Emission of smog ingredients from trees is increasing rapidly
2. Study explores gene transfer to modify underlying course of Alzheimers disease
3. Study reveals why eyes in some paintings seem to follow viewers
4. Study by Israeli scientists provides insight on DNA code
5. Study reveals first genetic step necessary for prostate cancer growth
6. Study of flu patients reveals virus outsmarting key drug
7. Study in Science reveals recreational fishing takes big bite of ocean catch
8. Study suggests cell-cycle triggers might be cancer drug targets
9. Study narrows search for genes placing men at increased risk for prostate cancer
10. Study links high carbohydrate diet to increased breast cancer risk
11. Study explains spatial orientation differences between sexes

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:12/2/2019)... ... December 01, 2019 , ... ... greatest tools, technologies, and techniques to hit the life-science landscape. For more than ... products speeding work in laboratories and facilitating biological discovery. This year’s crop of ...
(Date:11/27/2019)... Glen Ellyn, IL (PRWEB) , ... November 26, ... ... Jessica Gibbs, invite patients to their Glen Ellyn, IL practice for Invisalign® ... discreetly straighten crooked teeth. , Patients with a misaligned bite, also known as ...
(Date:11/27/2019)... ... November 27, 2019 , ... The MyOnyx ... electromyography (sEMG) sensors that measure and display muscle activity in real time. This ... targeted for treatment. Both patient and therapist can see when exercises are performed ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/12/2019)... ... 12, 2019 , ... Fiberstar, Inc., a global market leader ... a new innovative website. , After extensive research, Fiberstar revamped the ... updated ingredient usage tables by food application and video tutorials. And, this site ...
(Date:11/6/2019)... ... November 06, 2019 , ... Diversified Technologies, Inc. has introduced a ... per hour to improve processing. , The DTI Industrial PEF Unit can pre-treat whole ... increase juice yields by up to 50% and achieve up to an 80% reduction ...
(Date:11/5/2019)... Calif. (PRWEB) , ... November 05, 2019 , ... Ole, a German Shepherd, was demonstrating ... with stairs and jumping. Though his energy level and his willingness to play were ... veterinary surgeon Dr. Holly Mullen of VCA Emergency Animal Hospital and Referral Center ...
(Date:10/30/2019)... ... ... While using cold plasma to kill cancer cells isn’t an entirely novel ... & Technology are exploring new ways to regulate cold plasma technology to target ... technique would prove to be a drug-free, minimally invasive cancer treatment that would affect ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: