HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Technique plucks rapidly evolving genes from a pathogen's genome

Berkeley - A quick new technique able to identify genes that evolve rapidly as well as those that change slowly already has pinpointed new targets for researchers developing drugs against tuberculosis and malaria, and it could do the same for other infectious diseases, according to a paper in this week's Nature.

The technique, reported in the April 29 issue of the journal, was developed by researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, Harvard and Princeton universities, and the National Institutes of Health.

Genes that change slowly or not at all in an organism, or from one organism to another, usually turn out to be critical pieces of molecular machinery and, in an infectious organism, attractive targets for researchers hoping to kill it

Alternatively, genes that change rapidly are presumed to be under selective evolutionary pressure, such as the need for a microbe to continually switch its outer coat to escape detection by the human immune system. Such genes can tell researchers how organisms outwit the immune system or develop drug resistance.

This new technique is a total departure from current methods of finding rapidly evolving genes, and has already pinpointed previously unknown genes in the tuberculosis and malaria parasites that could be potential drug targets.

"In the typical comparative method, researchers take equivalent genes from several organisms, like humans and chimps and mice, line them up and count the differences," explained coauthor Hunter B. Fraser, a graduate student in molecular and cell biology at UC Berkeley. "That gives you an idea of what kinds of changes a gene has undergone over evolution, and from the kinds of changes you see, you can infer something about the way it is evolving - whether it has been pressured to change or pressured to stay the same.

"We're coming out with a similar end result - knowing what kinds of evolutionary pressures are on different genes - but we can
'"/>

Contact: Robert Sanders
rls@pa.urel.berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley
29-Apr-2004


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Nerve cells guided to repair spinal damage: Technique
2. Technique kills cancerous cells, leaves healthy cells intact
3. Technique may identify novel disease genes at a faster clip
4. Technique brings immune-based therapies closer to reality
5. Technique to induce cancer cells to commit suicide developed by Hebrew University scientists
6. UF Anthropologists Study Techniques To Solve Mysteries Of Dead Bodies
7. Penn Researchers Develop Gene Therapy Technique That Reverses Muscle Membrane Weakness In Muscular Dystrophy Variant
8. Researchers Uncover 3-D Structure Of Virus Replication Technique
9. UF Researcher: New Techniques Help Reconstruct Ancient Diets
10. Technique Measures Muscle Contraction At Molecular Level
11. New Monitoring Technique Checks Thyroid Cancer Without Misery

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/29/2019)... ... , ... In the wake of the success of IBBL’s ... biobanks was launched in July 2018, in an agreement between IBBL, the International ... Biotech Association (BBCMBA). The one-year pilot programme offered two testing schemes: ‘DNA quantification ...
(Date:3/27/2019)... ... March 27, 2019 , ... NDA Partners Chief Executive Officer ... Health & Pharma Biotechnology Award as the Best Life Sciences Management & Contract ... individuals and companies whose accomplishments have proved evidence of extensive expertise and skills, ...
(Date:3/25/2019)... , ... March 25, 2019 , ... ... Visikol, a contract research organisation focused on advancing drug discovery, have announced a ... imaging. , Tissue clearing methods, which are essential to get a better view ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:4/12/2019)... ... April 12, 2019 , ... ... neurotechnology and will educate about innovative tools and devices being used to enhance ... for more information. , This segment of Advancements will focus on Sound for ...
(Date:4/9/2019)... , ... April 09, 2019 , ... The American ... members of the Society's leadership team, including a new addition to the presidential line ... of their peers to join the Society's leadership team for a three-year term (2019-2021). ...
(Date:4/4/2019)... ... , ... LeadingBiotech, an exclusive event series bringing biopharma CEOs ... CEO conference to be held May 28-29, 2019 at Boston’s Four Seasons Hotel. ... and discussions from past, present and future change-makers. , LeadingBiotech, formerly ...
(Date:3/23/2019)... ... 2019 , ... uBiome has awarded microbiome research support in ... Nnamdi Azikiwe University in Anambra State, Nigeria led by Dr. Kingsley C. Anukam, ... Medical Laboratory Sciences and Deputy Provost, College of Health Sciences. The study hopes ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: