HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
The Frozen Zoo: the University of New Orleans and the new world of saving endangered species

(New Orleans)-University of New Orleans scientists and professors are working on several programs aimed at preserving genetic diversity, increasing endangered animal populations, and saving animals on the brink of extinction--by stockpiling the genetic material (eggs, embryos, and sperm). They freeze the samples at -320°F and store them in liquid nitrogen tanks. The goal is: if the animals near extinction, the samples can be thawed and used to produce offspring through assisted reproductive technologies such as artificial insemination, embryo transfer, in vitro fertilization, embryo splitting, and inner cell mass transfer with the goal of repopulating them in their original habitat.

This is the scientists' "frozen zoo." By banking cryogenically preserved genetic material for future use, they create a safety net against the extinction of a species. This genetic material can be collected from animals in the wild, preserved in liquid nitrogen, and used to increase the number of individuals of captive species with the goal of repopulating them in their original habitat.

"If you freeze cells properly, you can revive them through precise thawing. The cells we're putting in this frozen zoo are viable and functional," says Dr. Betsy Dresser, the Virginia Kock/Audubon Institute Endowed Chair in Reproduction and Conservation of Endangered Species at the University of New Orleans (UNO), director of the Audubon Center for Research of Endangered Species (the Research Center) in New Orleans, and professor in the UNO Department of Biological Sciences' new Ph.D. program for Conservation Biology. She says, "The frozen zoo can, theoretically, store this material for hundreds, even thousands, of years."

This is where the recent affiliation agreement between the University of New Orleans and the Research Center comes into play. It pledges to "establish a research and educational alliance" to focus on relevant issues of biodiversity and the environment.
'"/>

Contact: Joseph White
jewhite1@uno.edu
504-280-6622
University of New Orleans
7-Mar-2001


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Frozen lake beneath Antarctica ideal to test sterile drilling techniques
2. Frozen pictures allow far-reaching glimpse into the cells protein factory
3. Indiana University, EPA to study airborne PCBs
4. University of Alberta researcher looks for clues to mysterious disease
5. Northeastern University receives $12.4 million NSF grant for creation of nanomanufacturing institute
6. Washington University in St. Louis leads group studying aging process
7. Tufts University establishes $4 million dollar tissue engineering resource center
8. Case for IBD combination therapy comes from research at Baylor, MIT and Hebrew University
9. As informatics grows, Indiana University helps set research agenda
10. University of Arizona licenses patent for natural fungicide
11. Washington University in St. Louis plays key role in sequencing moss genome

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/31/2014)... prestin was found to be a key gene responsible for ... the hair cells of the inner ear that contracts and ... an antique phonograph horn, amplify sound waves to make hearing ... in the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and ... has also independently evolved to play a critical role in ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... has long been known that biomass burning ... as a ritual , slash-and-burn agriculture and wildfires ... health. , But until the release of a ... Engineering Professor Mark Z. Jacobson, the degree of ... Jacobson,s research, detailed in a paper published July ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... team of scientists from Spain, France, and the ... that is the oldest definitive member of the ... amber. The discovery and description were made possible ... synchrotron imaging technique, which allows the detailed study ... new species is described in the journal ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 2Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 3Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 4
(Date:8/1/2014)... (PRWEB) August 01, 2014 Testing ... led to a better understanding embryonic development. ... reorganize into structurally and functionally distinct tissues is ... defects. Prof. Todd McDevitt, Melissa Kinney, and ... signals interact with biochemical cues to control many ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... people over 60 are not donor candidates for bone ... time, making the elderly prone to life-threatening infection and ... now has discovered a reason why. , "We have ... blood-forming cells to maintain blood production over time in ... could be restored for rejuvenation therapies," said Emmanuelle Passegu, ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... , July 31, 2014 The SNIS ... with $25,000 to fund a translational research project.  ... 2011, the gift was presented at the Society ... Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO. ... neurointerventional approaches to neurovascular conditions, SNIS formed the ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... , July 31, 2014 ... Market Research "Electrodes for Medical Devices Market (Diagnostic Electrodes ... Therapeutic Electrodes - TENS, Pacemakers, Defibrillators, Electrosurgical and Other ... and Forecast, 2013 - 2019," the global electrodes market ... in 2012 and is estimated to reach a market ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Study Links Biomechanics and Gene Expression in Stem Cells 2Key to aging immune system is discovered 2SNIS Foundation Bestows First Grant Award For Cutting-Edge NeuroInterventional Research 2SNIS Foundation Bestows First Grant Award For Cutting-Edge NeuroInterventional Research 3Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 2Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 3Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 4Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 5Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 6
Cached News: