HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
The future of HIV therapeutics is brightening, according to Gladstone Institutes Director

Recent discoveries about the way that HIV infects cells are propelling the development of a broad spectrum of promising new antiviral drugs, according to an invited commentary on the topic in the current issue of Nature Immunology (August 27, 2004).

The assessment is made by Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology (GIVI) Director Warner Greene, MD, PhD, who also serves as professor of medicine, microbiology and immunology at the University of California, San Francisco.

In the piece, Greene points out that basic research on HIV, a relatively simple pathogen with only nine genes encoding 15 proteins, are leading to compelling new therapies that deny the initial entry of HIV into its cellular host. In addition, fast-moving research of naturally occurring factors with potent antiviral properties is opening the way for future development of an entirely new class of anti-HIV drugs.

New agents that block the first step in HIV's life cycle, the entry of the HIV virion (a single virus particle) into host CD4 T-cells, are quickly moving down the drug development pipeline. Chief among these therapeutics are drugs known as chemokine receptor antagonists that interfere with HIV's ability to bind to CCR5, one of two key surface receptors needed for the virus to penetrate the cell. Although these HIV co-receptors were identified only seven years ago, basic studies performed by both GIVI investigators and scientists around the world have helped accelerate clinical development of CCR5 antagonists as a new class of anti-HIV drugs. Several major pharmaceutical companies are now racing to the finishing line.

These advances address but one of the three steps required for successful entry of the HIV virus. The other two steps involve the attachment of HIV virions to surface CD4 receptors and the final fusion of virions to target cells. These steps are also being targeted with new antiviral drugs. Combinations of inhibitors acting at each o
'"/>

Contact: John Watson
jwatson@gladstone.ucsf.edu
415-695-3833
University of California - San Francisco
27-Aug-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. New fruitfly model of diabetes has future implications for pancreatic cell transplantation
2. Charting the future in prostate cancer care: A call to action
3. Sandia experiments may reduce possibility of future water wars
4. Will a reduction in military spending improve our environmental future?
5. Engineering endurance: The future of the Olympics?
6. The future of nanotechnology
7. Chemoradioimmunotherapy for advanced breast cancer: hope for the future?
8. Endometriosis: Could angiostatic therapy be the new treatment of the future?
9. Plants for the future: A European vision for plant biotechnology towards 2025
10. Plant pathologists to discuss the future of organic farming
11. Stem cells commit to a future of fat with one signal

Post Your Comments:
(Date:11/10/2014)... appearing on U.S. store shelves in early 2010, and ... The small packets can be tossed into a washing ... or powder. The convenience, though, has come with risks ... at Nationwide Children,s Hospital found that from 2012 through ... children younger than 6 years of age swallowing, inhaling, ...
(Date:11/6/2014)... because of metastasis, yet progress in preventing and ... "It,s been particularly challenging to design drugs that ... in systems biology at Harvard Medical School. ... they,ve already metastasized." , Gujral and colleagues have ... researchers better understand how metastasis begins. Their findings ...
(Date:11/5/2014)... Rio de Janeiro, Brazil -Individuals show great diversity in ... importantly, males and females greatly differ in their perceptual ... kinds of smell tests. , Sex differences ... social behaviors and may be connected to one,s perception ... and emotions. Thus, women,s olfactory superiority has been suggested ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Study finds laundry detergent pods, serious poisoning risk for children 2Migration negation 2Migration negation 3The female nose always knows: Do women have more olfactory neurons? 2
(Date:11/26/2014)... -- Theravalues Corporation est fier d,annoncer le lancement ... salon Hi Europe 2014 (du 2 au 4 décembre ... Curcumine la plus biodisponible actuellement sur le marché, ... ingrédients approuvés par les règlements européens. ... la racine de curcuma ( Curcuma longa ) ...
(Date:11/24/2014)... Five American winners will receive ... Awards for Medical Sciences", in its 8 th ... , on 15 December 2014.      ... Carter Center which won the Hamdan Award for Volunteers ... programs that aim to improve health and promote peace ...
(Date:11/24/2014)... USA (PRWEB) November 23, 2014 One of ... field of optics and photonics is now available to high ... very low cost. SPIE, the international society for optics ... to the complete SPIE Digital Library available to ... price. , “Light-based technologies are integral to all areas of ...
(Date:11/24/2014)... Senior Vice President, General Manager for Clinical ... acumen Elsevier , a world-leading provider ... congratulates Diane Bartoli , Senior Vice President and ... Solutions, for being recognized in the 13 th ... Profiles in Diversity Journal ® . ...
Breaking Biology Technology:La curcumine présentant la plus haute biodisponibilité bientôt en vente en Europe 2La curcumine présentant la plus haute biodisponibilité bientôt en vente en Europe 3Five US Winners Among Recipients of Hamdan Medical Awards 2SPIE Digital Library Now Available to High Schools, Two-Year Colleges at No or Low Cost 2Elsevier Clinical Solutions' Diane Bartoli Featured In Profiles in Diversity Journal's 13th Annual Women Worth Watching Issue 2Elsevier Clinical Solutions' Diane Bartoli Featured In Profiles in Diversity Journal's 13th Annual Women Worth Watching Issue 3
Cached News: