HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
The path to a folded protein, long a subject of debate, appears in many cases to be long and winding

PHILADELPHIA Its a long-simmering debate in the world of physical chemistry: Does the folding of proteins into biologically active shapes better resemble a luge run fast, linear and predictable or the more freeform trajectories of a ski slope? New research from the University of Pennsylvania offers the strongest evidence yet that proteins shimmy into their characteristic shapes not via a single, unyielding route but by paths as individualistic as those followed by skiers coursing from a mountain summit down to the base lodge.

The new support for a more heterogeneous model of protein folding comes in a paper published today on the Web site of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"The traditional view has been that a protein passes through a series of fixed reactions to reach its folded state," said senior author Feng Gai, a Penn chemist. "Our work suggests quite strongly that folding is a far richer phenomenon. Like skiers, some proteins rocket down an energy gradient to their destination while others take their time, meandering indiscriminately."

Though a fleeting phenomenon, the folding of gangly proteins into tight three-dimensional shapes has broad implications for the growing group of human diseases believed to result from misfolded proteins, most notably neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimers and Parkinsons diseases. The characteristic plaques that cripple the brains of Alzheimers and Parkinsons patients are believed to be the dumping grounds for aberrant proteins.

Gais work subtly shifts scientists understanding of one possible remedy: molecular chaperones, promising compounds that "rescue" misfolded proteins and are believed capable of blocking the progression of neurodegenerative disease. Rather than giving sluggish proteins the oomph to finish folding, the Penn work indicates that chaperones may return misfolded proteins to an unfolded state so they can start all over again.

"In the s
'"/>

Contact: Steve Bradt
bradt@pobox.upenn.edu
215-573-6604
University of Pennsylvania
26-Feb-2002


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Unraveling a protein, researchers uncover mechanics of anti-cancer agent
2. Oral contraceptives increase C-reactive protein, an infIammatory biomarker
3. Statins may prevent damage by Alzheimers disease protein, USF study finds
4. Mice with human protein, COX-2, exhibit age-related memory loss similar to Alzheimers disease
5. Consuming more protein, less carbohydrates may be healthier
6. The protection of human subjects in gene transfer research explored at conference in July
7. Latest findings on PCBs to be subject of June workshop at Illinois
8. NIEHS and UNC to collaborate on registry of 20,000 subjects
9. Clock cells, tumor suicide, tailored therapies among subjects of AACR-NCI-EORTC Conference
10. DNA profiling is subject of two-day expert forum at Wright State
11. Embryonic facial development subject to insult or repair longer than expected

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:10/26/2019)... ... October 23, 2019 , ... ... Christina Hughes , to its executive leadership team. , As a market leader ... allow growth-stage biotech and pharma companies to reduce timelines and improve quality with ...
(Date:10/26/2019)... , ... October 24, 2019 , ... World Cord Blood ... parents, doctors, nurses, and midwives to learn about the current and future uses of ... Cord blood is now being used to treat and cure over 80 different life-threatening ...
(Date:10/26/2019)... ... October 24, 2019 , ... THE PRINCESS VEST, Made for women, designed by ... female providers, they were the only choice. Women in radiology had to settle for ... that can allow harmful radiation to penetrate the sides of the breasts. , ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:11/12/2019)... ... November 12, 2019 , ... REPROCELL Inc. a stem cell ... Lantern Pharma to provided preclinical screening and drug sensitivity for its portfolio of ... panels of unique and genetically edited cell lines from various tumors. The data ...
(Date:11/12/2019)... ... November 12, 2019 , ... Peggy Lillis Foundation (PLF) ... deadly healthcare-associated infection C. diff. The campaign, “See C. diff,” combines ... at least 30,000 people in the U.S. each year. The campaign also features ...
(Date:11/5/2019)... ... November 04, 2019 , ... ... and manufacturing solutions for drugs, biologics, gene therapies, and consumer health products, ... Boost. The technology enhances Catalent’s proven GPEx expression platform through multiple improvements, ...
(Date:11/2/2019)... ... October 31, 2019 , ... ... Biotechnologies in a live webinar on Friday, November 15, 2019 ... , Immunosequencing, the science of profiling T-cell receptors (TCRs) and B-cell receptors ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: