HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Tiny Molecular Channels Key To Protecting Heart During Attack

Hopkins Finding Could Lead To Development Of Better Cardioprotective Drugs

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have come one step closer to understanding the chain of events that protects the heart against injury during a heart attack, paving the way for the development of a new class of drugs to treat people at risk.

The team has found that tiny, energy-dependent channels within mitochondria -- the sacs of enzymes that act as powerhouses of cells -- may play a significant role during "preconditioning," a process in which brief coronary blood flow stoppages that precede a major heart event protect the heart against severe damage. Mitochondria convert carbohydrate energy into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the type of energy needed for such functions as muscle contraction.

Using rabbit heart cells, the researchers found that the blood pressure medicine diazoxide opened up channels in the cell membranes that let potassium flow into the cells. The drug opened the potassium channels in the mitochondria but had no effect on other channels. The team also found that when oxygen supply to the heart cells was stopped, as happens during a heart attack, diazoxide halved the rate of cell death.

Results of the study, supported by the National Institutes of Health, were published in the June 30 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. "During periods of ischemia, or lack of blood flow, cells lose energy and die," says Eduardo Marban, M.D., Ph.D., director of molecular and cellular cardiology at Hopkins and senior author of the study. "If we could keep the energy levels high during heart failure or a heart attack, we could buy time. While we're still not sure how opening these mitochondrial channels might protect heart cells from dying, we know that their role is crucial. This will help in developing a more effective class of cardioprotective drugs.

"There is goo
'"/>

Contact: Karen Infeld
kinfeld@jhmi.edu
(410)955-1534
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
30-Jun-1998


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Molecular motor implicated in tissue remodeling
2. 16th EORTC NCI AACR Symposium Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
3. 16th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
4. Molecular staples shape a cancer killer
5. Molecular motor myosin VI moves hand over hand, researchers say
6. Molecular therapeutics advance fight against brain cancer
7. Molecular motor shuttles key protein in response to light
8. Molecular traffic cop directs cellular signals
9. Molecular marker predicts success of breast cancer treatment
10. Molecular image of genotoxin reveals how bacteria damage human DNA
11. Molecular mechanism found that may improve ability of stem cells to fight disease

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/24/2016)... 24, 2016 Ampronix facilitates superior patient care by providing unparalleled technology to ... display is the latest premium product recently added to the range of products distributed ... ... ... Imaging- LCD Medical Display- Ampronix News ...
(Date:5/3/2016)... VILNIUS, Lithuania , May 3, 2016 /PRNewswire/ ... today released the MegaMatcher Automated Biometric Identification ... deployment of large-scale multi-biometric projects. MegaMatcher ABIS can ... and accuracy using any combination of fingerprint, face ... of MegaMatcher SDK and MegaMatcher ...
(Date:4/19/2016)... UAE, April 20, 2016 The ... as a compact web-based "all-in-one" system solution for all ... fingerprint reader or the door interface with integration authorization ... access control systems. The minimal dimensions of the access ... into the building installations offer considerable freedom of design ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/23/2016)... ... June 23, 2016 , ... Mosio, a ... eBook, “Clinical Trials Patient Recruitment and Retention Tips.” Partnering with experienced clinical research ... by providing practical tips, tools, and strategies for clinical researchers. , “The landscape ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Md. , June 23, 2016 A person ... from the crime scene to track the criminal down. ... the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses DNA evidence ... Sound far-fetched? It,s not. The FDA ... sequencing to support investigations of foodborne illnesses. Put as simply ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... 23, 2016  The Biodesign Challenge (BDC), a university ... to harness living systems and biotechnology, announced its winning ... New York City . ... showcased projects at MoMA,s Celeste Bartos Theater during the ... MoMA,s senior curator of architecture and design, and ...
(Date:6/23/2016)... Durham, NC (PRWEB) , ... June 23, 2016 , ... ... Odense University Hospital in Denmark detail how a patient who developed lymphedema after being ... (fat) tissue. The results could change the paradigm for dealing with this debilitating, frequent ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: