HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Tiny Molecular Channels Key To Protecting Heart During Attack

Hopkins Finding Could Lead To Development Of Better Cardioprotective Drugs

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have come one step closer to understanding the chain of events that protects the heart against injury during a heart attack, paving the way for the development of a new class of drugs to treat people at risk.

The team has found that tiny, energy-dependent channels within mitochondria -- the sacs of enzymes that act as powerhouses of cells -- may play a significant role during "preconditioning," a process in which brief coronary blood flow stoppages that precede a major heart event protect the heart against severe damage. Mitochondria convert carbohydrate energy into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the type of energy needed for such functions as muscle contraction.

Using rabbit heart cells, the researchers found that the blood pressure medicine diazoxide opened up channels in the cell membranes that let potassium flow into the cells. The drug opened the potassium channels in the mitochondria but had no effect on other channels. The team also found that when oxygen supply to the heart cells was stopped, as happens during a heart attack, diazoxide halved the rate of cell death.

Results of the study, supported by the National Institutes of Health, were published in the June 30 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. "During periods of ischemia, or lack of blood flow, cells lose energy and die," says Eduardo Marban, M.D., Ph.D., director of molecular and cellular cardiology at Hopkins and senior author of the study. "If we could keep the energy levels high during heart failure or a heart attack, we could buy time. While we're still not sure how opening these mitochondrial channels might protect heart cells from dying, we know that their role is crucial. This will help in developing a more effective class of cardioprotective drugs.

"There is goo
'"/>

Contact: Karen Infeld
kinfeld@jhmi.edu
(410)955-1534
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
30-Jun-1998


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Molecular motor implicated in tissue remodeling
2. 16th EORTC NCI AACR Symposium Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
3. 16th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics
4. Molecular staples shape a cancer killer
5. Molecular motor myosin VI moves hand over hand, researchers say
6. Molecular therapeutics advance fight against brain cancer
7. Molecular motor shuttles key protein in response to light
8. Molecular traffic cop directs cellular signals
9. Molecular marker predicts success of breast cancer treatment
10. Molecular image of genotoxin reveals how bacteria damage human DNA
11. Molecular mechanism found that may improve ability of stem cells to fight disease

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Tiny Molecular Channels Key Protecting Heart During Attack

(Date:4/15/2014)... Biologists at UC San Diego have succeeded in ... hormone responsible for growth and resistance to drought. ... studies to determine how the hormone helps plants ... by the continuing increase in the atmosphere,s carbon ... achievement appears in the April 15 issue of ...
(Date:4/15/2014)... Looking at the question of how social behavior has ... universities in Mainz and Basel have gained new insights ... simply compete for food. Rather the siblings share what ... absent," explained Dr. Jol Meunier of the Evolutionary Biology ... University of Mainz (JGU). The team of biologists from ...
(Date:4/15/2014)... (April 15, 2014) The American Association of Anatomists ... All awards will be presented during the Closing ... Hotel on Tuesday, April 29th at 7:30 p.m. during ... , The 2014 award winners are: , ... PhD, of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Biologists develop nanosensors to visualize movements and distribution of plant hormone 2Sibling cooperation in earwig families gives clues to early evolution of social behavior 2American Association of Anatomists 2014 award winners 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... January 15, 2014 This webinar ... on nonclinical and clinical safety assessment in biosimilars. ... guide a path for biosimilar drug development, however ... of biosimilarity with regards to quality, safety and ... of biosimilar drug development and registration, development strategies ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... NC (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 ... an enhancement to its Online Web Portal for Life ... now have the ability to specify the subject matter ... nearly 50 life science sub-domains. This will help reduce ... and scientific fields, and decrease the likelihood of error. ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... Doylestown, PA (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 ... – 11 p.m. , Location: Warrington Country Club, 1360 ... Hepatitis B Foundation, the only national nonprofit organization solely ... improving the quality of life for those affected worldwide, ... 11 at Warrington Country Club in Warrington, Pa. ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... York, NY (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 ... initiated coverage of Alliqua, Inc. (OTCQB: ALQA). Alliqua ... and marketing proprietary products to serve the wound ... , In late 2012, Alliqua was restructured ... launched the company’s new strategy to become a ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Xtalks Life Sciences Webinar Examines Safety Assessment of Biosimilars 2DTS Improves Efficiency for Life Science Document Translations 2Hepatitis B Foundation to Host Annual Crystal Ball Gala 2EquitiesIQ Initiates Coverage of Alliqua, Inc. 2EquitiesIQ Initiates Coverage of Alliqua, Inc. 3
Cached News: