HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
UI Laboratory Develops Procedure To Study DNA Replication

IOWA CITY, Iowa -- A University of Iowa research team has developed a way to isolate replicating deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules that scientists then can use to examine the replication process under controlled conditions. This advance will allow investigators to better understand DNA replication and may lead to improved therapies for treating diseases such as cancer.

"One of the difficulties with studying the DNA replication process is that there are multiple protein complexes involved, and it is difficult to experimentally dissect individual reactions that are occurring," said Marc Wold, Ph.D., UI associate professor of biochemistry and the project's principal investigator. "Our procedure will allow us to examine these reactions in more detail."

DNA is the genetic material that encodes all components in human cells. Each cell contains more than two meters of DNA. Every time a cell divides, it is necessary to duplicate all of its DNA.

Using DNA derived from the Simian Virus 40 from monkeys, Wold and members of his laboratory let DNA replication start in an extract from human cells. The researchers attach magnetic beads to the DNA molecules and use a magnet to isolate the molecules and associated replication proteins. The researchers can then manipulate the extracted DNA and add specific replication proteins in a controlled manner to understand the mechanics of DNA replication.

"This will mean we can start asking specific questions about the reactions during replication and learn more about the specific roles of replication proteins," Wold said.

The advantage of this system is that it allows separation of the DNA replication process from the synthetic reactions. This separation has been difficult to achieve in previous replication systems.

Using his technique, Wold hopes that his lab and others can begin to understand what causes some cells to mutate. DNA replication is a complex process that is very accurate and highly regulate
'"/>

Contact: Jennifer Cronin
jennifer-cronin@uiowa.edu
319-335-9917
University of Iowa
30-Mar-1999


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Laboratory grows world record length carbon nanotube
2. Story tips from the Department of Energys Oak Ridge National Laboratory, September 2004
3. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory gets $10 million from NIH to build virtual lung
4. Story tips from the Department of Energys Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2004
5. Story tips from the Department of Energys Oak Ridge National Laboratory, July 2004
6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop DOE leadership-class computing capability for science
7. Institute for Systems Biology, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory announce collaboration
8. Story tips from the Department of Energys Oak Ridge National Laboratory, April 2004
9. Laboratory rat gene sequencing completed
10. ORNL earns four Federal Laboratory Consortium awards
11. Story tips from the Department of Energys Oak Ridge National Laboratory, February 2004

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Laboratory Develops Procedure Study DNA Replication

(Date:7/31/2014)... prestin was found to be a key gene responsible for ... the hair cells of the inner ear that contracts and ... an antique phonograph horn, amplify sound waves to make hearing ... in the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and ... has also independently evolved to play a critical role in ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... has long been known that biomass burning ... as a ritual , slash-and-burn agriculture and wildfires ... health. , But until the release of a ... Engineering Professor Mark Z. Jacobson, the degree of ... Jacobson,s research, detailed in a paper published July ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... team of scientists from Spain, France, and the ... that is the oldest definitive member of the ... amber. The discovery and description were made possible ... synchrotron imaging technique, which allows the detailed study ... new species is described in the journal ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 2Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 3Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 4
(Date:8/1/2014)... (PRWEB) August 01, 2014 Testing ... led to a better understanding embryonic development. ... reorganize into structurally and functionally distinct tissues is ... defects. Prof. Todd McDevitt, Melissa Kinney, and ... signals interact with biochemical cues to control many ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... people over 60 are not donor candidates for bone ... time, making the elderly prone to life-threatening infection and ... now has discovered a reason why. , "We have ... blood-forming cells to maintain blood production over time in ... could be restored for rejuvenation therapies," said Emmanuelle Passegu, ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... , July 31, 2014 The SNIS ... with $25,000 to fund a translational research project.  ... 2011, the gift was presented at the Society ... Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO. ... neurointerventional approaches to neurovascular conditions, SNIS formed the ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... , July 31, 2014 ... Market Research "Electrodes for Medical Devices Market (Diagnostic Electrodes ... Therapeutic Electrodes - TENS, Pacemakers, Defibrillators, Electrosurgical and Other ... and Forecast, 2013 - 2019," the global electrodes market ... in 2012 and is estimated to reach a market ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Study Links Biomechanics and Gene Expression in Stem Cells 2Key to aging immune system is discovered 2SNIS Foundation Bestows First Grant Award For Cutting-Edge NeuroInterventional Research 2SNIS Foundation Bestows First Grant Award For Cutting-Edge NeuroInterventional Research 3Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 2Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 3Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 4Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 5Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 6
Cached News: