HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
USC study links historical increases in life span to lower childhood exposure to infection

Starting in the mid-1850s, humans began living longer due, researchers believe, to improvements in living conditions, nutrition, income levels and medicine.

But two USC gerontologists have found an invisible cause that could have important implications for modern-day health care.

In a paper published in the Sept. 17 issue of the journal Science, Caleb Finch and Eileen Crimmins firmly link this gradual yet steady increase in human life span to lower childhood rates of exposure to infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and malaria.

The key to their theory lies in one word: inflammation.

Infectious diseases cause chronic inflammation in the blood that, decades later, leads to heart attacks, strokes and cancers the classic killers of old age.

"We've put pieces together that are in front of everybody's nose and made a coherent hypothesis," said Caleb Finch, the study's lead author and holder of the ARCO-William F. Kieschnick Chair in the Neurobiology of Aging.

"Our main point is that in historical times when there was a lot of childhood mortality, even kids that didn't die got chronic infections. Those chronic infections from childhood onward accelerated vascular and other diseases," he said.

Finch and Crimmins, holder of the Edna M. Jones Chair in Gerontology, studied data on the health and mortality rates of people born in Sweden from 1751 to 1940. Grouping them by birth year into what are called birth cohorts the researchers found that as public health efforts led to less exposure to infectious diseases during childhood, people started living longer and better.

"Most people have been looking for an explanation for health change among the old in current conditions," Crimmins said. "We're saying that part of the roots of health in old age lie in childhood. That is what makes this study different because we started looking at the person and their living conditions at a muc
'"/>

Contact: Usha Sutliff
sutliff@usc.edu
213-740-0252
University of Southern California
16-Sep-2004


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. Student science contest participation influences study, career choices, alumni say
2. New study shows hope for treating inhalant abuse
3. International study findings link acne-like rash to effectiveness of new targeted cancer treatment
4. Cigarette smoke causes breaks in DNA and defects to a cells chromosomes, Pitt study finds
5. New study indicates arsenic could be suitable as first-line treatment in type of leukaemia
6. Phase II trials of second-generation antisense cancer drug planned following successful early study
7. Preclinical safety study shows adipose-derived stem cells improve heart function after heart attack
8. Indiana University, EPA to study airborne PCBs
9. K-State, other universities to study how climate affects plant evolution
10. Washington University in St. Louis leads group studying aging process
11. Simian virus 40 not associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, study shows

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:3/2/2020)... ... 2020 , ... Nominations are now being accepted for the 2020 Women ... (SIA) and SecureIDNews and co-presented with sponsors IDEMIA , ... of this year’s Women in Biometrics Awards will be honored at the 2020 SIA ...
(Date:2/28/2020)... ... 2020 , ... Meridian Clinical Research , a leading investigative research network, ... for Best Clinical Trial Site. Meridian is also the largest member of Platinum ... These nominations were the result of two voting rounds, and winners will be announced ...
(Date:2/28/2020)... ... February 27, 2020 , ... An ... innovative treatment solutions for maladies, such as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), specifically Crohn’s ... segment will focus on a novel platform developed by Deka Biosciences, Inc. (Deka ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:3/12/2020)... ... March 12, 2020 , ... ... microscopy (AFM) technology, increases the business investment in Europe by inaugurating a new ... Grand Opening Ceremony of the new Nanoscience Center Europe took place Tuesday, February ...
(Date:3/4/2020)... ... March 04, 2020 , ... ... services, today announced the launch of its FleXpress™ high-throughput recombinant antibody production ... of antibodies at 80 ml scale. All production occurs in Absolute Antibody’s ...
(Date:3/2/2020)... ... March 02, 2020 , ... McBee, Moore and Vanik ... list in the field of Biotechnology and Organics. , According to statistics compiled by ... of 259 patents issued in technology center 1600 during 2019. Technology center 1600 at ...
(Date:2/21/2020)... (PRWEB) , ... February 20, ... ... an exquisite capability to perform complex, efficient and elegant chemistry. Humans have ... algorithms to our own goals. , Through rapidly evolving technologies and strategies ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: