HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
UVa scientists detail salmonella protein

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va., Sept. 25 A protein in Salmonella bacteria called SipA invades healthy human cells by using two arms in a "stapling" action, according to scientists at the University of Virginia Health System. The U.Va. researchers, working with colleagues at Rockefeller University in New York, report their findings in the September 26 edition of the magazine Science.

Edward Egelman, professor of biochemistry and molecular genetics at U.Va., said the significance of this research is that it could be possible to design molecules to prevent SipA from binding to a protein called actin, preventing the severe infection associated with Salmonella.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, various types of the Salmonella bacteria are responsible for up to four million infections and 500 deaths in the United States every year. Salmonella can cause diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps. Most people recover without treatment, but young children, the elderly and people with compromised immune systems are at risk for developing severe infections. There is no vaccine to prevent Salmonella-related sickness.

Egelman and his colleagues found that SipA works as a molecular "staple" and tethers itself to actin, a protein found in all human cells. SipA can polymerize actin into long filaments.

This activity may explain how this bacterial protein helps rearrange a cell's cytoskeleton, or the inner scaffold that gives a cell shape and provides motility. By remodeling the cytoskeleton of host cells, bacterial proteins such as SipA allow the Salmonella bacteria to infect these cells.

"This is a cunning evolutionary pathway that has developed with Salmonella," Egelman said. "It has the interesting property of being able to control the host actin filaments by using arms to do it. It has actually evolved, we believe, to mimic human proteins that bind to actin. This allows Salmonella to become a Trojan horse of sorts, causing heal
'"/>

Contact: Bob Beard
reb8e@virginia.edu
434-982-4490
University of Virginia Health System
25-Sep-2003


Page: 1 2

Related biology news :

1. DNA lends scientists a hand, revealing new chemical reactions
2. Conference at UH opens doors for new scientists, engineers
3. Wisconsin scientists develop quick botox test
4. UCI scientists successfully target key HIV protein; breakthrough may lead to new drug therapies
5. Alaska scientists find Arctic tundra yields surprising carbon loss
6. UAF scientists discover new marine habitat in Alaska
7. Information system to help scientists analyze mechanisms of social behavior
8. Zoonotic diseases - European scientists unite to fight diseases
9. Israeli scientists reveal the plan of a key cellular machine
10. Study by Israeli scientists provides insight on DNA code
11. Computer scientists at UH developing nurturing computers

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:


(Date:5/23/2017)... first robotic gym for the rehabilitation and functional motor sense evaluation of ... Italy . The first 30 robots will be available from June ... . The technology was developed and patented at the IIT laboratories and ... thanks to a 10 million euro investment from entrepreneur Sergio Dompè. ... ...
(Date:5/16/2017)... , May 16, 2017   Bridge Patient ... organizations, and MD EMR Systems , an ... partner for GE, have established a partnership to ... product and the GE Centricity™ products, including Centricity ... These new integrations will allow ...
(Date:4/24/2017)... , April 24, 2017 Janice ... partner with  Identity Strategy Partners, LLP (IdSP) , ... or without President Trump,s March 6, 2017 ... Entry , refugee vetting can be instilled with greater ... (Right now, all refugee applications are suspended by ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):
(Date:6/22/2017)... (PRWEB) , ... June 21, 2017 , ... ... regional office in North Carolina, and engages Timothy Reinhardt to manage the new ... quality leadership at Pfizer Inc, with his most recent role as the Director ...
(Date:6/22/2017)... ... June 22, 2017 , ... Ovation Fertility supports the ... disease, bringing new hope for prospective parents who are challenged with costs of ... the World Health Organization’s designation in hopes of changing the way health insurers, ...
(Date:6/22/2017)... ... 2017 , ... The first human cell line HeLa, established in 1951, has ... cross-contamination of human cell lines with HeLa cells were published. Until recently, cross-contamination and ... and is associated with dramatic consequences for research. , In this educational webinar, ...
(Date:6/20/2017)... ... 20, 2017 , ... CTNext , Connecticut’s go-to resource ... a Higher Education Entrepreneurship Advisory Committee to implement the recommendations of the master ... representatives from 35 higher education institutions across the state over the past six ...
Breaking Biology Technology:
Cached News: