HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
UW-Madison scientists return to rat as biomedical research tool

MADISON - Ever a favorite of biologists because of its record as a model to understand ailments like diabetes and cancer, the lab rat lost its luster as a research tool during the past decade because it defied attempts to manipulate its genome in a prescribed way.

Now, using a novel combination of tried-and-true techniques, scientists have created the first "knockout" rats, specifically rats whose genomes have been stripped of genes that suppress breast cancer. The development, reported today (May 19) by a team of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in online editions of the journal Nature Biotechnology, promises to restore the rat to biomedical prominence.

"People have tried for more than 10 years to produce a knockout rat," says Michael N. Gould, a professor of oncology at UW-Madison's McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research and in whose laboratory the work was conducted.

For 100 years, he explains, the rat was the model of choice for many biomedical scientists. But a decade ago, when knockout technology was first widely deployed in the mouse, the sturdy rat was dethroned. Researchers rushed to take advantage of the biomedical possibilities of an animal model whose genome could be manipulated at will, adding or subtracting genes to gain surprising insight into a host of diseases and potential treatments.

The rat, says Gould, had been "compromised by the lack of a full genetic toolbox. Over the last 10 years, the government and drug companies have invested a lot in bringing the rat up to speed. But one of the last major elusive tools for our toolbox was the ability to knock out genes."

The ability to add or subtract genes to an animal's genome lends powerful insight into the basic mechanisms of disease. New methods of disease prevention and treatment in humans, as well as a better basic understanding of development, physiology and pathology have resulted from the ability of scientists to manipulate genes in liv
'"/>

Contact: Michael Gould
gould@oncology.wisc.edu
608-263-6615
University of Wisconsin-Madison
18-May-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. UW-Madison scientists find a key to cell division
2. National nanotech expert to address UW-Madison conference
3. UW-Madison researchers identify key to cancer cell mobility
4. UW-Madison team develops technique to create flu viruses
5. DNA lends scientists a hand, revealing new chemical reactions
6. Conference at UH opens doors for new scientists, engineers
7. Wisconsin scientists develop quick botox test
8. UCI scientists successfully target key HIV protein; breakthrough may lead to new drug therapies
9. Alaska scientists find Arctic tundra yields surprising carbon loss
10. UAF scientists discover new marine habitat in Alaska
11. Information system to help scientists analyze mechanisms of social behavior

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Madison scientists return rat biomedical research tool

(Date:7/24/2014)... leads to conflict among people around the world, a ... Health & Ecosystems: Analysis of Linkages (HEAL) Program Director ... tackle global biodiversity decline. , The harvest of wild ... and provides protein for more than a billion of ... that today,s unprecedented loss of wildlife, is bringing with ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... Invertebrate numbers have decreased by 45% on average over ... doubled, reports a study on the impact of humans ... the enormous benefits invertebrates such as insects, spiders, crustaceans, ... pollination and pest control for crops, decomposition for nutrient ... published in Science and led by UCL, ...
(Date:7/24/2014)... 24, 2014 Some sticky research out of York ... a certain species of toxic grass fungus: moose saliva ... Biology Letters , "Ungulate saliva inhibits a grassendophyte ... to red fescue grass (which hosts a fungus called ... slower fungus growth and less toxicity. , "Plants have ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):New study draws links between wildlife loss and social conflicts 2Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles 2Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles 3Moose drool inhibits growth of toxic fungus: York U research 2
(Date:7/23/2014)... and Russian Quantum Center at Skolkovo) and Mario ... the Institute of Physics in Bratislava, Slovakia) have ... particles passing through an amplifier and, conversely, when ... provided in an article published in the journal ... Quantum entangled particles are considered to be the ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... Ill. , July 23, 2014 /PRNewswire/ ... (SNA™) constructs as gene regulatory and immunotherapeutic ... has joined AuraSense Therapeutics, executive leadership ... 11. Prior to joining AuraSense ... and Chief Financial Officer of Cellular Dynamics ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... 23, 2014  Having the right people at the ... accelerating business growth and achieving clinical and operational goals. ... Leadership Summit, July 20-22, 2014, in San ... executives and healthcare experts discussing how partnerships have positively ... President & Chief Executive Officer of Cape Regional Medical ...
(Date:7/23/2014)... Israel , July 23, 2014 ... a portfolio company of Trendlines Agtech , ... of Israel,s leading agricultural ... , Valentis,s technology combines nanocrystalline cellulose ... pulp waste, with additional nanoparticles to produce highly ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Scientists find way to maintain quantum entanglement in amplified signals 2Scientists find way to maintain quantum entanglement in amplified signals 3Scientists find way to maintain quantum entanglement in amplified signals 4AuraSense Therapeutics Appoints Biotechnology Veteran David S. Snyder as Chief Financial Officer 2MSC and Cape Regional Medical Center Partner to Improve Cost, Quality and Outcomes 2Valentis Nanotech Signs MOU to Integrate Technology in Thermoplastics Production 2
Cached News: