HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
UW-Madison scientists return to rat as biomedical research tool

MADISON - Ever a favorite of biologists because of its record as a model to understand ailments like diabetes and cancer, the lab rat lost its luster as a research tool during the past decade because it defied attempts to manipulate its genome in a prescribed way.

Now, using a novel combination of tried-and-true techniques, scientists have created the first "knockout" rats, specifically rats whose genomes have been stripped of genes that suppress breast cancer. The development, reported today (May 19) by a team of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in online editions of the journal Nature Biotechnology, promises to restore the rat to biomedical prominence.

"People have tried for more than 10 years to produce a knockout rat," says Michael N. Gould, a professor of oncology at UW-Madison's McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research and in whose laboratory the work was conducted.

For 100 years, he explains, the rat was the model of choice for many biomedical scientists. But a decade ago, when knockout technology was first widely deployed in the mouse, the sturdy rat was dethroned. Researchers rushed to take advantage of the biomedical possibilities of an animal model whose genome could be manipulated at will, adding or subtracting genes to gain surprising insight into a host of diseases and potential treatments.

The rat, says Gould, had been "compromised by the lack of a full genetic toolbox. Over the last 10 years, the government and drug companies have invested a lot in bringing the rat up to speed. But one of the last major elusive tools for our toolbox was the ability to knock out genes."

The ability to add or subtract genes to an animal's genome lends powerful insight into the basic mechanisms of disease. New methods of disease prevention and treatment in humans, as well as a better basic understanding of development, physiology and pathology have resulted from the ability of scientists to manipulate genes in liv
'"/>

Contact: Michael Gould
gould@oncology.wisc.edu
608-263-6615
University of Wisconsin-Madison
18-May-2003


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. UW-Madison scientists find a key to cell division
2. National nanotech expert to address UW-Madison conference
3. UW-Madison researchers identify key to cancer cell mobility
4. UW-Madison team develops technique to create flu viruses
5. DNA lends scientists a hand, revealing new chemical reactions
6. Conference at UH opens doors for new scientists, engineers
7. Wisconsin scientists develop quick botox test
8. UCI scientists successfully target key HIV protein; breakthrough may lead to new drug therapies
9. Alaska scientists find Arctic tundra yields surprising carbon loss
10. UAF scientists discover new marine habitat in Alaska
11. Information system to help scientists analyze mechanisms of social behavior

Post Your Comments:
*Name:
*Comment:
*Email:
TAG: Madison scientists return rat biomedical research tool

(Date:4/17/2014)... and pathogens that devastate honeybees in Europe, Asia and ... do not appear to be impacting native honeybee populations ... researchers., The invasive pests include including Nosema microsporidia ... honeybees appear to be resilient to these invasive pests, ... control pests in Europe, Asia and the United States ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Current Biology on April 17 have discovered ... Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but related species ... example of an animal with sex-reversed genitalia. , ... animals, Neotrogla is the only example in ... Yoshizawa from Hokkaido University in Japan. , During copulation, ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system ... aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness. ... have the immunological equivalent of "neighborhood police" specialized ... single organ, instead of an entire city, the body. ... St. Louis have shown that the liver, skin and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests… for now 2East African honeybees are safe from invasive pests… for now 3In sex-reversed cave insects, females have the penises 2Some immune cells defend only 1 organ 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... SAN JOSE, California , January 15, 2014 ... antibody-drug conjugates for cancer, today announced the appointment of Thomas ... Reynolds has over 20 years, development experience gained in the ... Genetics. "I am delighted to welcome Tom at ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 This webinar ... nonclinical and clinical safety assessment in biosimilars. , Regulatory ... for biosimilar drug development, however the complex nature of ... quality, safety and efficacy extremely challenging. Based on the ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... January 15, 2014 More than 5 ... about 1 in 3 seniors will die with Alzheimer’s ... These jaw-dropping figures have shocked many Americans into looking ... help prevent these tragic age-related cognitive disorders. Jonathan Weisman, ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... The Microcompetition with Foreign DNA theory explains ... these latent viruses is the Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), and ... (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the body’s ... RA patients have high concentrations of EBV DNA in their ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Oxford BioTherapeutics Appoints Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD to its Board of Directors 2Oxford BioTherapeutics Appoints Thomas C Reynolds MD, PhD to its Board of Directors 3Xtalks Life Sciences Webinar Examines Safety Assessment of Biosimilars 2Biohack Pure Offers 5 Tips for Increasing Memory in 2014 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 2Study: Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Patients Have EBV; The CBCD Says this is Consistent with Microcompetition 3
Cached News: