HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
Umbilical cord blood transplants, bone marrow transplants save lives

MAYWOOD, Ill. Umbilical cord blood and bone marrow transplants at Loyola University are curing or slowing the progression of many cancers originating in the bone marrow (i.e., leukemia, myeloma) or lymphatic system (lymphoma).

More than 106,000 people in the U.S. each year are diagnosed with these life-threatening diseases.

"Even if other treatments have produced no results, a bone marrow transplant may save the patient's life," said Dr. Patrick J. Stiff, director of the Cardinal Bernardin Cancer Center and the Bone Marrow Transplant Program at Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Ill. Patients unable to find a matching bone marrow donor may have an alternative with umbilical cord blood (CB) transplantation.

Loyola's unique method of preparing the umbilical cord blood enables more stem cells to survive, according to Stiff, who also is professor of Medicine and Pathology, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

A transplant provides the patient with healthy, new stem cells to develop a new immune system. And it's working.

Holly Drucker, 30, of Chicago's north side; Adam McGillen, 25, of Sandwich, Ill.; Moira Minielly, 39, of Wilmette, Ill.; and Donna Marasco, 45, of Bolingbrook, Ill., were dying of cancer when they arrived at Loyola's Cardinal Bernadin Cancer Center during the past six years. At Loyola, Holly and Adam underwent umbilical cord blood transplant for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Moira, diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Donna, with chronic myelogenous leukemia, underwent bone marrow transplant at Loyola. Today all four are leading productive, happy lives.

Loyola has the largest bone marrow transplantation program in the Midwest, performing 160 transplants each year. It is a participating center in the National Marrow Donor Program network.

The latest statistics from the National Marrow Donor Program Network show the actual one-year patient su
'"/>

Contact: Joanne Swanson
jswanson@lumc.edu
708-216-2445
Loyola University Health System
1-Jun-2004


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Umbilical cord matrix, a rich new stem cell source, study shows
2. Duke Study Shows Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant Is Viable Treatment For Genetic Disorders
3. Experimental drug shown to block mutant protein causing blood disease
4. IBD (Crohns, Colitis) joins cancer, inflammatory diseases in associated blood vessel growth
5. A probable cause for high blood pressure identified - shows links with diabetes
6. Probing the surface of white blood cells to enhance immune system medicine
7. Streptococcus infects humans by thwarting blood clotting
8. Strep disrupts blood clotting to infect humans
9. Nucleic acid-amplification testing further safeguards nations blood supply
10. Hopkins scientists use blood proteins to detect ovarian cancer
11. Marijuana ingredient inhibits VEGF pathway required for brain tumor blood vessels

Post Your Comments:
(Date:7/31/2014)... prestin was found to be a key gene responsible for ... the hair cells of the inner ear that contracts and ... an antique phonograph horn, amplify sound waves to make hearing ... in the advanced online edition of Molecular Biology and ... has also independently evolved to play a critical role in ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... has long been known that biomass burning ... as a ritual , slash-and-burn agriculture and wildfires ... health. , But until the release of a ... Engineering Professor Mark Z. Jacobson, the degree of ... Jacobson,s research, detailed in a paper published July ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... team of scientists from Spain, France, and the ... that is the oldest definitive member of the ... amber. The discovery and description were made possible ... synchrotron imaging technique, which allows the detailed study ... new species is described in the journal ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 2Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 3Stanford professor finds that wildfires and other burns play bigger role in climate change 4
(Date:8/1/2014)... (PRWEB) August 01, 2014 Testing ... led to a better understanding embryonic development. ... reorganize into structurally and functionally distinct tissues is ... defects. Prof. Todd McDevitt, Melissa Kinney, and ... signals interact with biochemical cues to control many ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... people over 60 are not donor candidates for bone ... time, making the elderly prone to life-threatening infection and ... now has discovered a reason why. , "We have ... blood-forming cells to maintain blood production over time in ... could be restored for rejuvenation therapies," said Emmanuelle Passegu, ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... , July 31, 2014 The SNIS ... with $25,000 to fund a translational research project.  ... 2011, the gift was presented at the Society ... Meeting in Colorado Springs, CO. ... neurointerventional approaches to neurovascular conditions, SNIS formed the ...
(Date:7/31/2014)... , July 31, 2014 ... Market Research "Electrodes for Medical Devices Market (Diagnostic Electrodes ... Therapeutic Electrodes - TENS, Pacemakers, Defibrillators, Electrosurgical and Other ... and Forecast, 2013 - 2019," the global electrodes market ... in 2012 and is estimated to reach a market ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Study Links Biomechanics and Gene Expression in Stem Cells 2Key to aging immune system is discovered 2SNIS Foundation Bestows First Grant Award For Cutting-Edge NeuroInterventional Research 2SNIS Foundation Bestows First Grant Award For Cutting-Edge NeuroInterventional Research 3Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 2Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 3Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 4Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 5Electrodes for Medical Devices Market Expected to Reach USD 1.45 Billion Globally in 2019: Transparency Market Research 6
Cached News: