HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
University Of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center Researchers Identify Protein That,,May Cause Nerve Cell Death In Alzheimer's Disease

LEXINGTON, KY (August 3, 1998) -- A team of University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center researchers has recently discovered that Par-4, a protein, may lead to nerve cell death in Alzheimer's disease and related brain disorders. Announced in the August issue of Nature Medicine, the research results show an increased level of the protein -- Par-4 -- in nerve cells in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients, suggesting the protein may be a contributing factor to the disease.

Blocking Par-4 might be useful as a future treatment for the disease, said Mark Mattson, Ph.D., UK professor of anatomy and neurobiology. "The study's findings identify a new molecular target upon which to aim the emerging arsenal of weapons in the battle against Alzheimer's disease," Mattson said.

Par-4 may play a critical role in nerve cell death in Alzheimer's disease and related brain disorders. Cell death is a fundamental problem in age-related neurodegenerative disorders -- in Alzheimer's disease, nerve cells critical for learning and memory die.

Previous studies have shown that nerve cells in the brains of Alzheimer's patients die by apoptosis, a term used to describe programmed cell death. During the process of apoptosis, a cell shrinks and its DNA (string-like molecules that make up genes) becomes broken into small pieces. Each gene in DNA carries the information required to produce one specific protein. When the gene is expressed, or "switched on," the protein is made. During apoptosis, genes are activated that encode "killer proteins," and these proteins signal cells to begin dying.

The identity of the "killer proteins" and their place in the cascade of events leading to cell death has been a mystery to scientists for decades. The current research may fill one more piece in the puzzle.

Vivek Rangnekar, Ph.D., associate professor of microbiology and immunology, UK College of Medicine, discovered the gene that codes for Par-4 in 1993.
'"/>

Contact: Kim Cumbie
krcumb0@pop.uky.edu
(606) 323-6363
University of Kentucky Medical Center
4-Aug-1998


Page: 1 2 3 4

Related biology news :

1. Indiana University, EPA to study airborne PCBs
2. University of Alberta researcher looks for clues to mysterious disease
3. Northeastern University receives $12.4 million NSF grant for creation of nanomanufacturing institute
4. Washington University in St. Louis leads group studying aging process
5. Tufts University establishes $4 million dollar tissue engineering resource center
6. Case for IBD combination therapy comes from research at Baylor, MIT and Hebrew University
7. As informatics grows, Indiana University helps set research agenda
8. University of Arizona licenses patent for natural fungicide
9. Washington University in St. Louis plays key role in sequencing moss genome
10. University of Pittsburgh receives $10 million grant for head and neck cancer
11. Clemson University spin-off uses corn to make plastics, provide cleaner air

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/23/2014)... a newly coined term for novels and films which focus ... of Copenhagen shows how these fictions serve as a mental ... climate change and imagine other living conditions. , "Global ... the atmosphere; it is also a cultural phenomenon in which ... the films we see. And there are so many of ...
(Date:4/23/2014)... at the University of Houston (UH) is working to ... His work is supported by a $1.8 million grant ... Blood transfusions save millions of lives every year. They ... for instance, routine surgeries would become life threatening. This ... that transfusions of red blood cells stored in a ...
(Date:4/22/2014)... There,s a new secret to get your child to behave ... , A new Cornell study published in Eating Behaviors ... they had to bite with their front teeth such as ... rowdier than when these foods had been cut. ... as aggressive toward other kids," said Brian Wansink, Professor and ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Fiction prepares us for a world changed by global warming 2Fiction prepares us for a world changed by global warming 3UH biomedical engineer works to make blood transfusions safer 2UH biomedical engineer works to make blood transfusions safer 3Biting vs. chewing 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... January 15, 2014 More than 5 ... about 1 in 3 seniors will die with Alzheimer’s ... These jaw-dropping figures have shocked many Americans into looking ... help prevent these tragic age-related cognitive disorders. Jonathan Weisman, ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2014 DTS Language Services, Inc . ... Portal for Life Science organizations who need document translations. ... matter of their documents in advance with a selection of ... of translations, often a critical factor in clinical and scientific ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... AudioNotch is the internet's leading provider of Notched Sound ... Patients listen to sound therapy that is tailor-made for ... to months, their tinnitus volume decreases. , AudioNotch has previously ... Notched White Noise. Now, AudioNotch is pleased to announce to ...
(Date:1/14/2014)... (PRWEB) January 14, 2014 Carahsoft and ... Thursday, January 23, 2014 at 2pm EST (11am PST), ... The topic focuses on how technology can turn raw, ... decisions for government agencies. The online webinar will last ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Biohack Pure Offers 5 Tips for Increasing Memory in 2014 2DTS Improves Efficiency for Life Science Document Translations 2Webcast - Natural Language Processing: Converting Raw Data into Actionable Knowledge – Hosted by Carahsoft and CDS Federal Services 2
Cached News: