HOME >> BIOLOGY >> NEWS
University Of Pittsburgh Scientist Discovers How A Novel Vitamin K Stops Cancer Cell Growth

PITTSBURGH, June 1 -- Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh have discovered how a novel form of vitamin K exerts its cancer-killing effects in primary liver cancers, which are notoriously resistant to chemotherapy. The research results, published in the May issue of The Journal of Biological Chemistry, describe an important new way to treat, and possibly prevent, cancer by triggering programmed cell death.

"Our finding is extremely important if we are to maximize the use of vitamin K compounds against cancer," noted Brian Carr, M.D., Ph.D., FRCP, professor of surgery in the Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation Institute and director of the Liver Cancer Center at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI). "Through our ongoing research, we now know that the vitamin K compounds not only can kill liver cancers, but also can destroy other types of cancer in tissue cultures, including breast cancer and melanoma. They do so by a quite novel growth-regulating mechanism."

"One of the attractive features of this unique compound is that it appears to stop cancer cell growth without producing toxicity. We now are testing this compound against cancers in rats, and given positive results, we hope to begin clinical trials of this agent within two years."

The Pitt research team found that a vitamin K analog, Compound 5 (Cpd 5), causes an imbalance in the normal activity of enzymes that control the addition or removal of small molecules called phosphate groups from selected proteins inside cells. Specifically, Cpd 5 blocks the activity of enzymes called protein-tyrosine phosphatases, which normally remove phosphate groups from selected proteins inside liver cancer cells. However, Cpd 5 does not interfere with another group of enzymes called protein tyrosine-kinases, which add phosphate groups to these same proteins. The result is an excess of what are called tyrosine phosphorylated proteins, which trigger a variet
'"/>

Contact: Lauren Ward
wardla@a1.isd.upmc.edu
412-624-2607
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
1-Jun-1998


Page: 1 2 3

Related biology news :

1. Indiana University, EPA to study airborne PCBs
2. University of Alberta researcher looks for clues to mysterious disease
3. Northeastern University receives $12.4 million NSF grant for creation of nanomanufacturing institute
4. Washington University in St. Louis leads group studying aging process
5. Tufts University establishes $4 million dollar tissue engineering resource center
6. Case for IBD combination therapy comes from research at Baylor, MIT and Hebrew University
7. As informatics grows, Indiana University helps set research agenda
8. University of Arizona licenses patent for natural fungicide
9. Washington University in St. Louis plays key role in sequencing moss genome
10. University of Pittsburgh receives $10 million grant for head and neck cancer
11. Clemson University spin-off uses corn to make plastics, provide cleaner air

Post Your Comments:
(Date:4/17/2014)... hundred births, Down syndrome - or trisomy 21 - ... It results from a chromosomal abnormality where cells of ... (1% of the human genome). A study conducted by ... Genetic Medicine and Development at the University of Geneva ... shed light on how the extra chromosome 21 upsets ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... Rajendra Singh Thursday as a "Champion of Change" ... deployment in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors. ... Electrical and Computer Engineering and director of Clemson,s ... hero leading the charge across the country to ... and driving policy changes at the local level ...
(Date:4/17/2014)... channels are implicated in many serious conditions such as ... potential target for drug therapies. Unfortunately, there is still ... Cambridge research provides fresh and unexpected insight into the ... components - β-subunit molecules - which are responsible for ... published in the most recent edition of the ...
Breaking Biology News(10 mins):Trisomy 21: How an extra little chromosome throws the entire genome off balance 2Trisomy 21: How an extra little chromosome throws the entire genome off balance 3White House honors Clemson professor as 'Champion of Change' for solar deployment 2Structure of sodium channels different than previously believed 2
(Date:1/15/2014)... Toronto, Canada (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 ... perspectives on nonclinical and clinical safety assessment in biosimilars. ... a path for biosimilar drug development, however the complex ... regards to quality, safety and efficacy extremely challenging. Based ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2014 Two champions of science, technology, ... of an annual competition for middle and high school ... innovative STEM study. The competition presents students with real-world ... Engineering Aptitude, Mathematics, and Sciences is a program ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... 2013 was a banner year of continued ... saw continued independent research led by the team at ... $1 million grant from the Susanne Marcus Collins Foundation, ... peer reviewed journal, Amy Grant highlighted Brainwave Optimization® in ...
(Date:1/15/2014)... TaiGen Biotechnology Company, Limited ("TaiGen") today announced that they ... Russian pharmaceutical company, to develop and commercialize nemonoxacin (Taigexyn ... , Turkey and other members ... antibiotic for the treatment of bacterial infections including those ...
Breaking Biology Technology:Xtalks Life Sciences Webinar Examines Safety Assessment of Biosimilars 2Technology Student Association Partners with Leaders in STEM Education Advocacy for Annual Competition 2Technology Student Association Partners with Leaders in STEM Education Advocacy for Annual Competition 3Technology Student Association Partners with Leaders in STEM Education Advocacy for Annual Competition 4Technology Student Association Partners with Leaders in STEM Education Advocacy for Annual Competition 5Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 2Dynamic Innovative Technology Showcased at Scottsdale Company’s Open House 3TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 2TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 3TaiGen Biotechnology Signed Exclusive License Agreement with R-Pharm for Nemonoxacin (Taigexyn(R)) 4
Cached News: